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The SQDC Is Now Selling Actual Cannabis Edibles

Clusters of dates, hemp hearts, and sunflower seeds infused with 2.5 mg of THC have hit shelves in Quebec

green sign that says “SQDC” SQDC/Facebook

A cannabis edible that requires chewing — not just sipping — has finally made its way to Quebec’s government-run cannabis retailer, the SQDC.

The cannabis bites, made of dates, hemp hearts, sunflower seeds, currants, and cinnamon, have been for sale in-store and online at the SQDC since Tuesday, per the Le Journal de Quebec. The product is from Solei, whose parent company is “cannabis lifestyle” goods giant Tilray Brands, and comes in 15-gram morsels, each containing 2.5 mg of THC and 5 mg of CBD. They’re sold for $6.90 for a pack of two.

Though the SQDC began selling cannabis beverages in January 2020 and now stocks 47 products in the category on its online store, it hasn’t ventured into ready-to-eat items until now, more than three years since opening its first stores.

That’s likely because Quebec’s Legault government has adopted the strictest stance on edibles in the country. After Canada legalized the sale of cannabis edibles on October 17, 2019 (one year after the legalization of recreational marijuana), Quebec introduced its own set of regulations limiting the kinds of edibles that may be sold, mainly so that they do not appeal to minors.

That means some of the most popular pot confections — think chocolatey brownies and neon-coloured candy — are off the table. Cue Solei’s brown, fruity clumps in their stead.

“[T]his product is not a candy or dessert, and it is not attractive to younger people in its shape, its ingredients, and its packaging,” SQDC spokesperson Fabrice Giguère tells Eater over email, explaining that the SQDC collaborated with the supplier to ensure its product was compliant with current provincial regulations.

Want to consume (legal) weed in a form not intentionally made to look lacklustre? The SQDC also sells cannabis powders that it says can be baked into pretty much anything.

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