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Where to Find Thin, Meaty Lahmajoun in and Around Montreal

10 options for the beefy flatbreads

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Dough with meat: these three words contain multitudes. Whether written as lahmajun, lahem bi ajin, lahmacun, or lahmajoun (as is often the case in Montreal), this thin flatbread with a topping of minced beef, onions, tomatoes, herbs, and, sometimes, red peppers, is traditionally sold in Armenian, Syrian, Turkish, and Lebanese bakeries, reflecting the regions from which it hails. These days, new purveyors are joining those that have been around for decades, giving the perfectly thin “pizza” a boost in popularity across the city. Each of the options on this map offers up different (and tasty) takes on lahmajoun — ready to grab and go.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Boulangerie Arax

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The old-school screen door at Arax’s strip-mall location in Laval opens into a homey space where lahmajoun is but one of the featured specialties; Arax also makes twisted bâtons salés (salty sticks) to go with coffee, yeasted brioche buns for breakfast, and some pretty wonderful vine leaves, too. 

Lahmajoun Sevan

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The gleaming counters of Laval’s Sevan bakery contain marvels: in addition to lahmajoun, there are spicy cheese pies, pre-folded spinach and feta pies, and frozen khinkali dumplings — think giant-sized Georgian-style xiao long bao, with a top knot. Lucky customers might arrive in time for Sevan’s freshly-made coiled, flaky cinnamon-tahini buns, perfect with coffee or afternoon tea.

Boulangerie Patisseries Haddad

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Tucked away in a strip mall more known for dim sum and Asian groceries, Boulangerie Haddad is open from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. for lahmajoun cravings. Classic family recipes reign here, making it a local favourite.

Boulangerie Seta

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On school days, the lineups at Seta go almost around the block; the kids know a deal when they eat it. Seta’s lahmajoun and homemade soujouk sausage sandwiches are a big draw here. Seta’s freezer also holds huge bags of manti dumplings and family-size platters of kibbeh and pasticcio; dinner, done and dusted.

Abu Elias Boucherie et Grillade

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Halal butcher and sandwich purveyor Abu Elias keeps its lahmajoun in the refrigerator section, along with a treasure trove of homemade prepared foods like hummus and vine leaves. Heat up those meat pies at home, along with their shish barak (open-topped meat dumplings) made with a similar meat mixture — and top them all with Abu’s garlic sauce for a great meal.

Pâtisserie Armenia

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Owner Khatjadour Merdjanian opened Patisserie Armenia in 1982 on Henri-Bourassa, moving to the present location on Fleury in 1988. Aficionados buy frozen lahmajoun by the dozen, with a fresh one to snack while chatting with Merdjanian and his wife, Seema. The diminutive bakery also makes tiny manti beef dumplings to go and two sizes of souboureg — a deep dish, layered cheesy casserole made with thin sheets of fresh dough — in two sizes, personal and crowd-pleasing.

Pizza Arménienne Arouch Liège

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Drive-through lahmajoun? Arouch has got that covered at their Laval branch. They’re still operating in Park Ex, where the compact shop on Liège offers a range of possibilities in a spotless location. Don’t miss the chance to put fresh mint on your meat pie, one of the options for customization.

Lahmajoune Villeray

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Recently opened in the former site of Chez Apo, one of the city’s iconic Armenian bakeries, this bright spot a stone’s throw from Jarry Park features classic thin-crust lahmajoun and a range of flatbreads complemented by in-house dips and pastries. Check out mom’s kibbeh and the family favourite, ma’amoul: butter cookies stuffed with dried fruit. 

Trip de bouffe

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This Avenue Mont Royal grocery and catering shop has been slinging lahmajoun and Lebanese sides for over a decade in the Plateau. Hot dishes and a huge range of classics make for a great pit stop before heading up the mountain for a picnic or home for dinner. Try their tiny spheres of pressed labneh with zaatar or oregano for an added treat. 

Café chez Téta

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Teta means grandmother in Lebanese Arabic, and co-owner Antoun Aoun’s grandmother is the inspiration for Plateau newcomer Café Chez Teta, a sunny café offering lahmajoun along with Lebanese cardamom coffee and manouchés, flatbreads covered in zaatar and a range of other toppings.

Boulangerie Arax

The old-school screen door at Arax’s strip-mall location in Laval opens into a homey space where lahmajoun is but one of the featured specialties; Arax also makes twisted bâtons salés (salty sticks) to go with coffee, yeasted brioche buns for breakfast, and some pretty wonderful vine leaves, too. 

Lahmajoun Sevan

The gleaming counters of Laval’s Sevan bakery contain marvels: in addition to lahmajoun, there are spicy cheese pies, pre-folded spinach and feta pies, and frozen khinkali dumplings — think giant-sized Georgian-style xiao long bao, with a top knot. Lucky customers might arrive in time for Sevan’s freshly-made coiled, flaky cinnamon-tahini buns, perfect with coffee or afternoon tea.

Boulangerie Patisseries Haddad

Tucked away in a strip mall more known for dim sum and Asian groceries, Boulangerie Haddad is open from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. for lahmajoun cravings. Classic family recipes reign here, making it a local favourite.

Boulangerie Seta

On school days, the lineups at Seta go almost around the block; the kids know a deal when they eat it. Seta’s lahmajoun and homemade soujouk sausage sandwiches are a big draw here. Seta’s freezer also holds huge bags of manti dumplings and family-size platters of kibbeh and pasticcio; dinner, done and dusted.

Abu Elias Boucherie et Grillade

Halal butcher and sandwich purveyor Abu Elias keeps its lahmajoun in the refrigerator section, along with a treasure trove of homemade prepared foods like hummus and vine leaves. Heat up those meat pies at home, along with their shish barak (open-topped meat dumplings) made with a similar meat mixture — and top them all with Abu’s garlic sauce for a great meal.

Pâtisserie Armenia

Owner Khatjadour Merdjanian opened Patisserie Armenia in 1982 on Henri-Bourassa, moving to the present location on Fleury in 1988. Aficionados buy frozen lahmajoun by the dozen, with a fresh one to snack while chatting with Merdjanian and his wife, Seema. The diminutive bakery also makes tiny manti beef dumplings to go and two sizes of souboureg — a deep dish, layered cheesy casserole made with thin sheets of fresh dough — in two sizes, personal and crowd-pleasing.

Pizza Arménienne Arouch Liège

Drive-through lahmajoun? Arouch has got that covered at their Laval branch. They’re still operating in Park Ex, where the compact shop on Liège offers a range of possibilities in a spotless location. Don’t miss the chance to put fresh mint on your meat pie, one of the options for customization.

Lahmajoune Villeray

Recently opened in the former site of Chez Apo, one of the city’s iconic Armenian bakeries, this bright spot a stone’s throw from Jarry Park features classic thin-crust lahmajoun and a range of flatbreads complemented by in-house dips and pastries. Check out mom’s kibbeh and the family favourite, ma’amoul: butter cookies stuffed with dried fruit. 

Trip de bouffe

This Avenue Mont Royal grocery and catering shop has been slinging lahmajoun and Lebanese sides for over a decade in the Plateau. Hot dishes and a huge range of classics make for a great pit stop before heading up the mountain for a picnic or home for dinner. Try their tiny spheres of pressed labneh with zaatar or oregano for an added treat. 

Café chez Téta

Teta means grandmother in Lebanese Arabic, and co-owner Antoun Aoun’s grandmother is the inspiration for Plateau newcomer Café Chez Teta, a sunny café offering lahmajoun along with Lebanese cardamom coffee and manouchés, flatbreads covered in zaatar and a range of other toppings.

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