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21 Must-Try Pizza Places in Montreal

Where to go for XL New York slices, old-school Montreal pies, and a Neapolitan pizza done cacio e pepe style

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With its large and impassioned Italian community, it’s no surprise Montreal is home to plenty of great pizzerias, including many wood-fired Neapolitan options and spots for Roman-style al taglio, too. And while it’s not as well-known as certain regional styles (say, New York, Chicago, or Detroit), Montreal has its own style of pizza that goes a little something like this: medium-to-thick crust, ringed with pillowy air pockets, a layer of sweet to savoury tomato sauce, scatters of thinly sliced mushrooms, pepperoni, green bell peppers, and a generous pile of melted mozzarella.

Along with the vanguard of old-school Montreal-style ‘zas found in all corners of the island, and all the Neapolitan classics, the city now also boasts newer arrivals serving up everything from foldable Manhattan slices to lesser-seen Sicilian squares. This map gives love to them all.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Da Bologna

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A fixture in Montreal North since 1958, Da Bologna's yeasty dough, which it also uses for subs, has disciples all over the city. Toppings are generous and often depart from your standard all-dressed in wild, delicious ways. The Mercedes Arrabbiata, for one, has spicy capicola, pepperoni, and olive oil-soaked hot peppers.

Antonietta

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The folks behind this charming three-year-old Italian joint place heavy emphasis on the seasonality of ingredients for its pasta and appetizer options, but when it comes to pizza, they know not to play around. There’s the amatriciana, generously topped with guanciale and mozzarella, or for a fan favourite, the cacio e pepe, which like the classic pasta dish packs a delightfully peppery punch.

Moccione Pizza

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After mesmerizing Montrealers with their pasta primping skills, the team behind Moccione leaped into the world of pizza-making last fall. Expect 11 different pies, including one topped with potato, rosemary, and smoked mozzarella; and another with rapini, sausage, and garlic confit. Additional menu items, like an asiago-filled arancini appetizer and a pistachio-orange-ricotta cannoli for dessert, skillfully round out the menu.

Pizzeria Gema

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Stefano Faita and Michele Forgione, the duo that helped redefine what quality Italian food could be for Little Italy with Impasto, gave the neighbourhood a sibling pizzeria six years back — and it’s still one of the best in town. Diners can’t go wrong with any of Gema’s Neapolitan creations, but its take on the Hawaiian (with smoked maple ham, oven-roasted pineapples, and mozzarella di bufala) is a highlight. Sister pizzeria Vesta, out in Villeray, dishes pies with a more American bent, and also merits a visit.

Bottega (multiple locations)

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Make your way to St-Zotique Street for a pair of powerhouse sibling pizza places you won’t want to sleep on. First, there’s Bottega, slinging some of the finest wood-fired Neapolitan pies in the city (and some delectable calzones, too). While next door, at Café San Gennaro, it’s al taglio square slices all day, every day. The latter is great for a quick bite (or coffee and sweet), while the former, is a white table-clothed venue, ideal for wine-filled evenings. Bottega also has a second location, off the island, in Laval.

Located on a nondescript strip of Bellechasse Street, in La Petite-Patrie’s western stretch, Elio’s pizza is hard to pin down stylistically: not quite old-school delivery, New York-style, or Neapolitan. It’s just Elio’s — and has been that way since 1964. Large enough to accommodate up to 700 diners (when counting its reception halls), yet homey all the same, Elio’s is a great bet for groups of all sizes.

Pizza Bouquet

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In response to the “lack of slice culture” in Montreal, Pizza Bouquet opened in the back of the popular, LGBTQ-friendly watering hole Notre Dame des Quilles at the beginning of 2018. Now with a standalone location across the street, it’s become even more of a sought-after slice shop. Owner-operator Andre Theriault sells pizza topped with everything from soppressata to potato and rosemary — both by the slice and the pie.

Segreta

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Since immigrating to Montreal in 1978, Segreta owner and pizzaiolo Richi Ourichian spent much of his adult life working in the shoe cobbling business, but he recently swung for the fences with a Roman-style al taglio pizzeria in Parc-Ex, and he’s hit a home run. Segreta does half-meter slabs of square slices on a crisp, yet tender base with toppings like spicy Italian sausage, potato chunks, and smoked caciocavallo cheese, or pepperoni with burrata.

Pizzeria Magpie

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Magpie’s wood-fired oven — late of the defunct Tutto Bene on St-Viateur — whips up pizzas made with excellent base ingredients: 00 flour, San Marzano red sauce, and quality cheese. The margherita here, generously studded with fat basil leaves, is among the best in the city, but many fall for the “spanikopizza,” with feta, spinach, dill, and parsley. The digs are cozy, and oysters and some solid plates of pasta are on offer, too.

Pizza Toni

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Following the success of Falafel Yoni in Mile End, owner Yoni Amir used his name (with a twist) for another venture several doors down. Pizza Toni’s menu is largely made up of New York-style pizza in classic flavours including pepperoni, margherita, and marinara, with prices running from $26 to $31 for whole XL 20-inch pies. Newer to the menu are options like the sweet cherry pie (with goat cheese, sun-dried cherry tomatoes, and a drizzle of spicy honey), the Triple P (with provolone, pepperoni, and pickled jalapeño), or what it calls “grandma” style, thicker, chewier, rectangular slabs sure to prompt some repeat visits.

Amelias

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Chris Scodras made his first pizza at Amelios in 1985, with his wife Aristia and brother George as partners in the new restaurant — and life for McGill students (and other Milton-Parc residents) was never the same after that. The original Amelios overcame bankruptcy a few years back and promptly reopened as Amelias.

Moleskine

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Moleskine's more formal upstairs section (headed up by chef Frédéric St-Aubin) has charmed many in town, but the more casual downstairs set-up — particularly the pizza — is just as lovable. Wood-fired, blistered crusts mix crunchiness and tenderness, and toppings oscillate between classic and inventive (see: a mornay pie). The pizzeria also runs a popular food counter at Time Out Market, for those looking for a cheesy bite in the downtown core.

Il Focolaio

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Downtown Montreal is a little light on good pies, but Il Focolaio’s wood-fired, thin-crust pies have been combatting that shortage for more than 30 years. At 77 pizzas long, the menu at this Square Phillips spot has any topping you might desire, ranging from beef meatballs to ratatouille (eggplant, zucchini, green peppers, fresh tomatoes, onions, and mozzarella). Vegan and gluten-free options are also available.

Fiorellino (multiple locations)

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This reliable Italian snack bar is known to prepare classic antipasti like meatballs and fritto misto (a mix of fried ingredients) and gorgeous plates of pasta, but its ovens also crank out some excellent, char-spotted pies in saucy and sauce-less (“bianca”) varieties, making it an essential Montreal pizza destination, too. Downtown Montreal, Mile End, and Little Burgundy are all lucky to have their own outpost.

Gentile Pizza Parlour

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After immigrating from Sicily and opening a café in the Garment District sixty years ago, the family behind Cafe Gentile now also runs a pizza parlour in Westmount (right by its second café) — and it’s paying off. Pies come big at 16 inches and there’s a special pizza to try every week. There’s also Sicilian pizza and a few classics from the original place like lasagna, Italian subs, and a buffalo fried chicken burger. The pizza parlour’s mosaic tile-clad dining room, designed by the local talent at Atelier Zébulon Perron, channels 1980’s nostalgia with success, but takeout and delivery are also on offer.

When Tony Campanelli opened his no-nonsense St-Henri slice joint back in 2015, he was among the first in Montreal to champion thin-crust, New York-style pizza. But the goal wasn’t to become some trendy spot; at the time, Campanelli said he wanted “Adamo to be an old-school place that lasts 100 years, not just another cool place to be seen in.” The takeout counter serves pizza by the oversized pie or slice, with toppings like calabrese salami, or ricotta, rapini, and mozzarella, among those winning over the Sud-Ouest crowd.

This St-Henri pizzeria from Nora Gray co-owners Emma Cardarelli and Ryan Gray, alongside partner Marley Sniatowsky, has received rave reviews ever since its doors flew open back in 2018. The restaurant’s stylish interior, natural wines, and additional Italian fare make it an excellent date-night destination, but its wood-fired pizza is at the center of the offering. Try the M. Funguy (wild mushroom and taleggio), or its alla palla, an oblong pie topped with tomato sauce, stracciatella cheese, and a generous dusting of parmesan.

G Pizzas

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NDG’s newest pizza purveyor gets points for simultaneously keeping in line with tradition and veering into unexpected territory. The takeout and delivery spot is devoted to handmade Roman-style rounds (tonda) and squares (al taglio), with the margherita and pepperoni standards, alongside options like the Dr. Greenthumb (with pesto and za’atar) and Le King Julian (with a Madagascar green pepper béchamel, preserved lemons, and sausage). Pizzas are sold ready-to-eat or ready-to-heat to ensure the freshest experience possible.

Named after two of the owners’ grandmothers, this Verdun pizzeria might be more stylish than eating at your Nonna’s place, but it’s certainly got the equivalent level of heart. There are 13 pizza options including a namesake one topped with black olives and pecorino, a pistachio-dotted pie slathered with a Grana Padano béchamel, as well as pasta and dessert options like an Earl Grey panna cotta or an ice cream sundae with espresso-flavoured gelato and almond sorbet.

Pizza Nino

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No Montreal pizza map is complete without a pushpin on Ville-Émard. And when you talk about pizza in the Sud-Ouest enclave, Nino should be front of mind. The family-run restaurant has fed three generations of Ville-Émard residents since opening in 1959, and, appropriately, is now run by the granddaughter of the founder. This is quintessential old-school Montreal pizza.

The premises are relatively unglamorous, but many a West Islander swears by this half-century-old Pointe-Claire stalwart. It’s thoroughly Montreal-style, with family-pleasing pizzas coming heavily loaded with toppings, including its famous deluxe — all-dressed plus bacon and onions.

Da Bologna

A fixture in Montreal North since 1958, Da Bologna's yeasty dough, which it also uses for subs, has disciples all over the city. Toppings are generous and often depart from your standard all-dressed in wild, delicious ways. The Mercedes Arrabbiata, for one, has spicy capicola, pepperoni, and olive oil-soaked hot peppers.

Antonietta

The folks behind this charming three-year-old Italian joint place heavy emphasis on the seasonality of ingredients for its pasta and appetizer options, but when it comes to pizza, they know not to play around. There’s the amatriciana, generously topped with guanciale and mozzarella, or for a fan favourite, the cacio e pepe, which like the classic pasta dish packs a delightfully peppery punch.

Moccione Pizza

After mesmerizing Montrealers with their pasta primping skills, the team behind Moccione leaped into the world of pizza-making last fall. Expect 11 different pies, including one topped with potato, rosemary, and smoked mozzarella; and another with rapini, sausage, and garlic confit. Additional menu items, like an asiago-filled arancini appetizer and a pistachio-orange-ricotta cannoli for dessert, skillfully round out the menu.

Pizzeria Gema

Stefano Faita and Michele Forgione, the duo that helped redefine what quality Italian food could be for Little Italy with Impasto, gave the neighbourhood a sibling pizzeria six years back — and it’s still one of the best in town. Diners can’t go wrong with any of Gema’s Neapolitan creations, but its take on the Hawaiian (with smoked maple ham, oven-roasted pineapples, and mozzarella di bufala) is a highlight. Sister pizzeria Vesta, out in Villeray, dishes pies with a more American bent, and also merits a visit.

Bottega (multiple locations)

Make your way to St-Zotique Street for a pair of powerhouse sibling pizza places you won’t want to sleep on. First, there’s Bottega, slinging some of the finest wood-fired Neapolitan pies in the city (and some delectable calzones, too). While next door, at Café San Gennaro, it’s al taglio square slices all day, every day. The latter is great for a quick bite (or coffee and sweet), while the former, is a white table-clothed venue, ideal for wine-filled evenings. Bottega also has a second location, off the island, in Laval.

Elio's

Located on a nondescript strip of Bellechasse Street, in La Petite-Patrie’s western stretch, Elio’s pizza is hard to pin down stylistically: not quite old-school delivery, New York-style, or Neapolitan. It’s just Elio’s — and has been that way since 1964. Large enough to accommodate up to 700 diners (when counting its reception halls), yet homey all the same, Elio’s is a great bet for groups of all sizes.

Pizza Bouquet

In response to the “lack of slice culture” in Montreal, Pizza Bouquet opened in the back of the popular, LGBTQ-friendly watering hole Notre Dame des Quilles at the beginning of 2018. Now with a standalone location across the street, it’s become even more of a sought-after slice shop. Owner-operator Andre Theriault sells pizza topped with everything from soppressata to potato and rosemary — both by the slice and the pie.

Segreta

Since immigrating to Montreal in 1978, Segreta owner and pizzaiolo Richi Ourichian spent much of his adult life working in the shoe cobbling business, but he recently swung for the fences with a Roman-style al taglio pizzeria in Parc-Ex, and he’s hit a home run. Segreta does half-meter slabs of square slices on a crisp, yet tender base with toppings like spicy Italian sausage, potato chunks, and smoked caciocavallo cheese, or pepperoni with burrata.

Pizzeria Magpie

Magpie’s wood-fired oven — late of the defunct Tutto Bene on St-Viateur — whips up pizzas made with excellent base ingredients: 00 flour, San Marzano red sauce, and quality cheese. The margherita here, generously studded with fat basil leaves, is among the best in the city, but many fall for the “spanikopizza,” with feta, spinach, dill, and parsley. The digs are cozy, and oysters and some solid plates of pasta are on offer, too.

Pizza Toni

Following the success of Falafel Yoni in Mile End, owner Yoni Amir used his name (with a twist) for another venture several doors down. Pizza Toni’s menu is largely made up of New York-style pizza in classic flavours including pepperoni, margherita, and marinara, with prices running from $26 to $31 for whole XL 20-inch pies. Newer to the menu are options like the sweet cherry pie (with goat cheese, sun-dried cherry tomatoes, and a drizzle of spicy honey), the Triple P (with provolone, pepperoni, and pickled jalapeño), or what it calls “grandma” style, thicker, chewier, rectangular slabs sure to prompt some repeat visits.

Amelias

Chris Scodras made his first pizza at Amelios in 1985, with his wife Aristia and brother George as partners in the new restaurant — and life for McGill students (and other Milton-Parc residents) was never the same after that. The original Amelios overcame bankruptcy a few years back and promptly reopened as Amelias.

Moleskine

Moleskine's more formal upstairs section (headed up by chef Frédéric St-Aubin) has charmed many in town, but the more casual downstairs set-up — particularly the pizza — is just as lovable. Wood-fired, blistered crusts mix crunchiness and tenderness, and toppings oscillate between classic and inventive (see: a mornay pie). The pizzeria also runs a popular food counter at Time Out Market, for those looking for a cheesy bite in the downtown core.

Il Focolaio

Downtown Montreal is a little light on good pies, but Il Focolaio’s wood-fired, thin-crust pies have been combatting that shortage for more than 30 years. At 77 pizzas long, the menu at this Square Phillips spot has any topping you might desire, ranging from beef meatballs to ratatouille (eggplant, zucchini, green peppers, fresh tomatoes, onions, and mozzarella). Vegan and gluten-free options are also available.

Fiorellino (multiple locations)

This reliable Italian snack bar is known to prepare classic antipasti like meatballs and fritto misto (a mix of fried ingredients) and gorgeous plates of pasta, but its ovens also crank out some excellent, char-spotted pies in saucy and sauce-less (“bianca”) varieties, making it an essential Montreal pizza destination, too. Downtown Montreal, Mile End, and Little Burgundy are all lucky to have their own outpost.

Gentile Pizza Parlour

After immigrating from Sicily and opening a café in the Garment District sixty years ago, the family behind Cafe Gentile now also runs a pizza parlour in Westmount (right by its second café) — and it’s paying off. Pies come big at 16 inches and there’s a special pizza to try every week. There’s also Sicilian pizza and a few classics from the original place like lasagna, Italian subs, and a buffalo fried chicken burger. The pizza parlour’s mosaic tile-clad dining room, designed by the local talent at Atelier Zébulon Perron, channels 1980’s nostalgia with success, but takeout and delivery are also on offer.

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Adamo

When Tony Campanelli opened his no-nonsense St-Henri slice joint back in 2015, he was among the first in Montreal to champion thin-crust, New York-style pizza. But the goal wasn’t to become some trendy spot; at the time, Campanelli said he wanted “Adamo to be an old-school place that lasts 100 years, not just another cool place to be seen in.” The takeout counter serves pizza by the oversized pie or slice, with toppings like calabrese salami, or ricotta, rapini, and mozzarella, among those winning over the Sud-Ouest crowd.

Elena

This St-Henri pizzeria from Nora Gray co-owners Emma Cardarelli and Ryan Gray, alongside partner Marley Sniatowsky, has received rave reviews ever since its doors flew open back in 2018. The restaurant’s stylish interior, natural wines, and additional Italian fare make it an excellent date-night destination, but its wood-fired pizza is at the center of the offering. Try the M. Funguy (wild mushroom and taleggio), or its alla palla, an oblong pie topped with tomato sauce, stracciatella cheese, and a generous dusting of parmesan.

G Pizzas

NDG’s newest pizza purveyor gets points for simultaneously keeping in line with tradition and veering into unexpected territory. The takeout and delivery spot is devoted to handmade Roman-style rounds (tonda) and squares (al taglio), with the margherita and pepperoni standards, alongside options like the Dr. Greenthumb (with pesto and za’atar) and Le King Julian (with a Madagascar green pepper béchamel, preserved lemons, and sausage). Pizzas are sold ready-to-eat or ready-to-heat to ensure the freshest experience possible.

Rita

Named after two of the owners’ grandmothers, this Verdun pizzeria might be more stylish than eating at your Nonna’s place, but it’s certainly got the equivalent level of heart. There are 13 pizza options including a namesake one topped with black olives and pecorino, a pistachio-dotted pie slathered with a Grana Padano béchamel, as well as pasta and dessert options like an Earl Grey panna cotta or an ice cream sundae with espresso-flavoured gelato and almond sorbet.

Pizza Nino

No Montreal pizza map is complete without a pushpin on Ville-Émard. And when you talk about pizza in the Sud-Ouest enclave, Nino should be front of mind. The family-run restaurant has fed three generations of Ville-Émard residents since opening in 1959, and, appropriately, is now run by the granddaughter of the founder. This is quintessential old-school Montreal pizza.

Gigi

The premises are relatively unglamorous, but many a West Islander swears by this half-century-old Pointe-Claire stalwart. It’s thoroughly Montreal-style, with family-pleasing pizzas coming heavily loaded with toppings, including its famous deluxe — all-dressed plus bacon and onions.

Related Maps