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12 Superb Québécois Restaurants in Montreal

Food from the heart of La Belle Province

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Like other big cities, Montreal’s culinary landscape is replete with a variety of influences, but there are a number of restaurants dedicated to representing the Quebec terroir on a plate. From giants like Au Pied de Cochon, where the rich, over-the-top fare captures the very essence of the region’s traditional cuisine, to spots like Candide and Hoogan et Beaufort, where the focus is on fresh local ingredients, the approaches to Québécois cuisine are as varied as they are delicious.

It’s tough to squeeze all of the province’s “signature” food into one guide, so a few key components of Quebec’s culinary traditions can be found elsewhere. Jewish traditions, for example, exert a strong influence in Montreal, and can be found over here; the cuisine of the Caribbean (Haiti, in particular) also has a major presence in the city, and that food guide is right here. And finally, Quebec’s most internationally famous dish, poutine, gets its very own guide here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Le St-Urbain

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This Ahuntsic restaurant has helped put the neighbourhood on the map with its seasonal menus, which feature market-fresh local ingredients and an appreciation for Quebec flavours. Not only is the food from chef-owner Marc-André Royal and chef Lindsay McLaren fantastic, there’s also a stellar selection of wines to bring out the best in each and every dish.

Hoogan et Beaufort

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The rotating menu at this Rosemont restaurant is anchored in what’s available both locally and seasonally, enhanced by an in-house fire pit. The restaurant is named after two farmers, and chef-owner Marc-André Jetté definitely does justice to that reference in the food put out.

Montréal Plaza

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Another fine dining take on Québécois fare, this modern spot is, in some ways, as far removed from traditional local cuisine as a restaurant could possibly be, but beyond the eclectic flavour pairings and quirky decor, Montreal Plaza’s ingredients are a showcase of the best that Quebec has to offer.

Caribou Gourmand

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Just because you don’t find yourself in a log cabin in the middle of the forest doesn’t mean you can’t eat like you’re in one — with an elevated twist, of course. This spot on St-Laurent offers casual Québécois foods with plenty of fish and game meat (think bison and yak).

Au Pied de Cochon

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Martin Picard’s restaurant is, for many, the temple of Quebecois gastronomy in Montreal. It has foie gras in all forms, including atop poutine and mac and cheese, inside of a burger and alongside the restaurant’s famous “duck in a can” dish. If you still have room at the end of it all, you can finish it off on a sweet note with a classic pudding chômeur.

La Binerie Mont-Royal

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It may be pretty far removed from the other (mostly) fine dining options on this map, but from fèves au lard and pea soup to pâté chinois and tourtière, this Plateau institution, which bills itself as “Quebec on your plate,” is a temple of old-school, hearty Québécois fare.

Le Mousso

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Another spot where local, seasonal fare takes centre stage, Le Mousso’s nightly tasting menu is one of the most exclusive in the city; it’s the only menu the restaurant offers, and is available for one sitting per evening, for a maximum of 30 guests. Those lucky 30 guests can expect the best local meat, fish, seafood and vegetables, all artfully prepared and combined.

Bouillon Bilk

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One of Montreal’s finest dining establishments, Bouillon Bilk conceptualizes dishes that are often traditionally Québécois in their ingredients, but much more modern in their preparations and flavour pairings. Take the combination of duck, strawberries, kohlrabi and soy in one of their dishes, or carrot with peach, feta and pistachios in another — and it totally works.

Labo Culinaire (Foodlab)

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Although it may sound more like a science experiment than a restaurant, Labo Culinaire’s menu is constantly changing with the seasons. Chef Émilie Bégin at the Société des Arts-located restaurant isn’t afraid to think outside the box to bring out the best of what local products — including those grown on its very own roof — have to offer.

Le Club Chasse et Pêche

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A fishing and hunting club it is not, but bounty from the sea and the land do feature heavily in the menus at Le Club Chasse et Pêche, in dishes like the quail with sumac, salsify, pistachio and giblets or the arctic char with sea asparagus, ikura, and white wine sauce. 

Toqué!

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After a nearly two-year-long hiatus, Normand Laprise and Christine Lamarche’s iconic fine dining establishment Toqué is back in action, serving creative, Quebec-inspired dishes using seasonal ingredients sourced largely from small local producers.

Candide

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John Winter Russell’s food is best described as having a “meat on the side” attitude, but the lack of extra protein doesn’t go amiss. Vegetables are a star here, which means they have to be good to start, and they certainly are. Candide is a prime example of how working closely with local producers pays off in the final dishes that are prepared — and it gets historical points for its location in a converted church

Le St-Urbain

This Ahuntsic restaurant has helped put the neighbourhood on the map with its seasonal menus, which feature market-fresh local ingredients and an appreciation for Quebec flavours. Not only is the food from chef-owner Marc-André Royal and chef Lindsay McLaren fantastic, there’s also a stellar selection of wines to bring out the best in each and every dish.

Hoogan et Beaufort

The rotating menu at this Rosemont restaurant is anchored in what’s available both locally and seasonally, enhanced by an in-house fire pit. The restaurant is named after two farmers, and chef-owner Marc-André Jetté definitely does justice to that reference in the food put out.

Montréal Plaza

Another fine dining take on Québécois fare, this modern spot is, in some ways, as far removed from traditional local cuisine as a restaurant could possibly be, but beyond the eclectic flavour pairings and quirky decor, Montreal Plaza’s ingredients are a showcase of the best that Quebec has to offer.

Caribou Gourmand

Just because you don’t find yourself in a log cabin in the middle of the forest doesn’t mean you can’t eat like you’re in one — with an elevated twist, of course. This spot on St-Laurent offers casual Québécois foods with plenty of fish and game meat (think bison and yak).

Au Pied de Cochon

Martin Picard’s restaurant is, for many, the temple of Quebecois gastronomy in Montreal. It has foie gras in all forms, including atop poutine and mac and cheese, inside of a burger and alongside the restaurant’s famous “duck in a can” dish. If you still have room at the end of it all, you can finish it off on a sweet note with a classic pudding chômeur.

La Binerie Mont-Royal

It may be pretty far removed from the other (mostly) fine dining options on this map, but from fèves au lard and pea soup to pâté chinois and tourtière, this Plateau institution, which bills itself as “Quebec on your plate,” is a temple of old-school, hearty Québécois fare.

Le Mousso

Another spot where local, seasonal fare takes centre stage, Le Mousso’s nightly tasting menu is one of the most exclusive in the city; it’s the only menu the restaurant offers, and is available for one sitting per evening, for a maximum of 30 guests. Those lucky 30 guests can expect the best local meat, fish, seafood and vegetables, all artfully prepared and combined.

Bouillon Bilk

One of Montreal’s finest dining establishments, Bouillon Bilk conceptualizes dishes that are often traditionally Québécois in their ingredients, but much more modern in their preparations and flavour pairings. Take the combination of duck, strawberries, kohlrabi and soy in one of their dishes, or carrot with peach, feta and pistachios in another — and it totally works.

Labo Culinaire (Foodlab)

Although it may sound more like a science experiment than a restaurant, Labo Culinaire’s menu is constantly changing with the seasons. Chef Émilie Bégin at the Société des Arts-located restaurant isn’t afraid to think outside the box to bring out the best of what local products — including those grown on its very own roof — have to offer.

Le Club Chasse et Pêche

A fishing and hunting club it is not, but bounty from the sea and the land do feature heavily in the menus at Le Club Chasse et Pêche, in dishes like the quail with sumac, salsify, pistachio and giblets or the arctic char with sea asparagus, ikura, and white wine sauce. 

Toqué!

After a nearly two-year-long hiatus, Normand Laprise and Christine Lamarche’s iconic fine dining establishment Toqué is back in action, serving creative, Quebec-inspired dishes using seasonal ingredients sourced largely from small local producers.

Candide

John Winter Russell’s food is best described as having a “meat on the side” attitude, but the lack of extra protein doesn’t go amiss. Vegetables are a star here, which means they have to be good to start, and they certainly are. Candide is a prime example of how working closely with local producers pays off in the final dishes that are prepared — and it gets historical points for its location in a converted church

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