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Montreal’s Chinatown gate
Kristi Blokhin/Shutterstock

Where to Eat and Drink in Chinatown

Noodles, buns, and dim sum in a compact Montreal neighbourhood

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Montreal’s Chinatown gate
| Kristi Blokhin/Shutterstock

Montreal’s Chinatown (running from Avenue Viger to Boulevard Rene Levesque, and Rue Jeanne-Mance to Rue St-Dominique) may be little in surface area, but it still manages to pack some great eats into the relatively small neighbourhood.

Whether you’re in the mood for upscale cocktails or a late night bowl of pho, these are some of the best spots to eat and drink in Chinatown.

Despite its name, Montreal’s Chinatown isn’t necessarily the city’s sole Chinese food destination, particularly in recent years — so if you’re looking for great tips on Chinese food, specifically? We’ve got a Chinese food map just for that.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Bar Le Mal Nécessaire

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Look for the neon pineapple and you’ll know you’ve found the place. Le Mal Nécessaire’s tiki-inspired cocktails are a fun novelty to enjoy with friends — and the happy hour specials are unbeatable for the quality and innovation of their drinks.

© Mariel Rosenblüth

Posted by Le Mal Nécessaire on Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Mon Nan

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Great for groups, Mon Nan has something for everyone — and it’s open late (until 2 a.m.). With basic Chinese, Thai, and Vietnamese dishes, here you’ll find everything from dim sum and dumplings to shark-fin soup and spicy frog’s legs.

La Capital Tacos

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This street-inspired Mexican eatery has made a happy home in Chinatown since 2015. Boasting classic al pastor tacos and chicharron and a strong selection of mezcal and tequila, La Capital is a great option for those looking for a quick bite alongside drinks.

If Lan Zhou is the old and classic favourite for hand-pulled noodles, Nudo is the young, upstart challenger. Expect cheap bowls of brothy noodles that will warm you from the inside. —Tim Forster

Mai Xiang Yuan

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Mai Xiang Yuan offers top notch fried and steamed dumplings (particularly xiaolongbao) and more. Great for meat-eaters and vegetarians alike, dumpling flavors range from lamb and cilantro to dried bean curd and Chinese cabbage. Bien Maison, right next door, is also run by the same people and similarly good quality.

Chez Bong

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Boasting unassuming Korean fare in a cozy basement space, this little Korean eatery feels like stepping into someone’s cottage — if their cottage was brimming with delicious, housemade kimchi and bibimbap.

Pho Bac

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Pho Bac has some of the best pho and Vietnamese iced coffee in Chinatown, and it also has vegetarian options such as vermicelli noodles and vegetable spring rolls. Tip: it’s cash only.

Nouilles de Lan Zhou

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Tucked into the tiny upstairs nook of a neighbourhood grocery store, unassuming Nouilles de Lan Zhou offers fantastic hand-pulled noodles with beefy broth. Sit at the bar or peek into the window from the street to watch the chefs craft the noodles fresh.

Kim Fung

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Montreal isn’t the greatest dim sum town, but Kim Fung is probably the best bet without heading to Brossard. Expect lots of classic buns, dumplings, tripe, and more, served from somewhat brusque trolley attendants. —Tim Forster

Little Sheep

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This Mongolian hot pot chain offers one of the most fun dining experiences in the city. Here, each hot pot is filled with an aromatic broth made from goji berries, jujubes and various spices. Then it’s up to the diner to cook their meat, vegetables and noodles within the broth, resulting in a fantastically flavourful experience.

CEO Karaoke

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In the mood to sing? Duck into the mall on Rue Clark and head down the stairs to the basement where CEO Karaoke awaits. While it has less bells and whistles than other Korean-style karaoke bars in the city, the drinks are cheap and the playlists have all the classics — and even if the space doesn’t live up to the executive name, nothing says CEO like a private room.

Patisserie Harmonie

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The go-to spot in Chinatown for sweet and savoury Chinese treats, Harmonie offers everything from luxuriant mango mousse to street food staples like sweet buns and hot dogs. There’s also a decent selection of bubble tea.

Beijing

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Westernized Cantonese and Szechuan food at its best, Beijing is open late (until 1:30 a.m.), with a vast menu and includes anything from beef and broccoli and chow mein to fried rice and noodle soup.

Orange Rouge

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Orange Rouge takes the word “fusion” and runs with it, far, with intriguing results, like buns with foie gras and tamarind, wontons with tzatziki, or a Korean take on tartare. At times odd, but never boring — wash it all down with a Thai-tinged mojito or Quebec microbrews. —Tim Forster

Bar Le Mal Nécessaire

Look for the neon pineapple and you’ll know you’ve found the place. Le Mal Nécessaire’s tiki-inspired cocktails are a fun novelty to enjoy with friends — and the happy hour specials are unbeatable for the quality and innovation of their drinks.

© Mariel Rosenblüth

Posted by Le Mal Nécessaire on Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Mon Nan

Great for groups, Mon Nan has something for everyone — and it’s open late (until 2 a.m.). With basic Chinese, Thai, and Vietnamese dishes, here you’ll find everything from dim sum and dumplings to shark-fin soup and spicy frog’s legs.

La Capital Tacos

This street-inspired Mexican eatery has made a happy home in Chinatown since 2015. Boasting classic al pastor tacos and chicharron and a strong selection of mezcal and tequila, La Capital is a great option for those looking for a quick bite alongside drinks.

Nudo

If Lan Zhou is the old and classic favourite for hand-pulled noodles, Nudo is the young, upstart challenger. Expect cheap bowls of brothy noodles that will warm you from the inside. —Tim Forster

Mai Xiang Yuan

Mai Xiang Yuan offers top notch fried and steamed dumplings (particularly xiaolongbao) and more. Great for meat-eaters and vegetarians alike, dumpling flavors range from lamb and cilantro to dried bean curd and Chinese cabbage. Bien Maison, right next door, is also run by the same people and similarly good quality.

Chez Bong

Boasting unassuming Korean fare in a cozy basement space, this little Korean eatery feels like stepping into someone’s cottage — if their cottage was brimming with delicious, housemade kimchi and bibimbap.

Pho Bac

Pho Bac has some of the best pho and Vietnamese iced coffee in Chinatown, and it also has vegetarian options such as vermicelli noodles and vegetable spring rolls. Tip: it’s cash only.

Nouilles de Lan Zhou

Tucked into the tiny upstairs nook of a neighbourhood grocery store, unassuming Nouilles de Lan Zhou offers fantastic hand-pulled noodles with beefy broth. Sit at the bar or peek into the window from the street to watch the chefs craft the noodles fresh.

Kim Fung

Montreal isn’t the greatest dim sum town, but Kim Fung is probably the best bet without heading to Brossard. Expect lots of classic buns, dumplings, tripe, and more, served from somewhat brusque trolley attendants. —Tim Forster

Little Sheep

This Mongolian hot pot chain offers one of the most fun dining experiences in the city. Here, each hot pot is filled with an aromatic broth made from goji berries, jujubes and various spices. Then it’s up to the diner to cook their meat, vegetables and noodles within the broth, resulting in a fantastically flavourful experience.

CEO Karaoke

In the mood to sing? Duck into the mall on Rue Clark and head down the stairs to the basement where CEO Karaoke awaits. While it has less bells and whistles than other Korean-style karaoke bars in the city, the drinks are cheap and the playlists have all the classics — and even if the space doesn’t live up to the executive name, nothing says CEO like a private room.

Patisserie Harmonie

The go-to spot in Chinatown for sweet and savoury Chinese treats, Harmonie offers everything from luxuriant mango mousse to street food staples like sweet buns and hot dogs. There’s also a decent selection of bubble tea.

Beijing

Westernized Cantonese and Szechuan food at its best, Beijing is open late (until 1:30 a.m.), with a vast menu and includes anything from beef and broccoli and chow mein to fried rice and noodle soup.

Orange Rouge

Orange Rouge takes the word “fusion” and runs with it, far, with intriguing results, like buns with foie gras and tamarind, wontons with tzatziki, or a Korean take on tartare. At times odd, but never boring — wash it all down with a Thai-tinged mojito or Quebec microbrews. —Tim Forster

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