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plate of herb-topped french fries with glass of orange wine on table.
Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up’s coriander and garlic fries.
Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up/Facebook

Where to Eat in Mercier-Hochelaga-Maisonneuve

A taqueria, a pizzeria, and BYOBs galore

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Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up’s coriander and garlic fries.
| Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up/Facebook

East-end Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, along with the even more easterly and borderline-industrial Mercier, is a borough too often overlooked as a worthwhile dining destination. But it is peppered with notable low-key bistros, some locally loved greasy spoons, and several newer arrivals. Here you’ll find our picks for the best of the bunch.

The borders used for this neighbourhood guide are as follows: the railroad near Préfontaine metro station to the west, a jagged line loosely around Sherbrooke to the north, the river to the south, and far-flung Georges V Avenue to the east.

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Bistro King Creole

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This is the neighbourhood go-to for griot (irresistibly tender cubes of pork shoulder), fritay (an assortment of fried foods including cod fritters and plantains), and hefty plates of Haitian-spiced chicken with macaroni salad and rice. A stone’s throw from Joliette metro station, it’s one of the few dining options located beyond Promenade Ontario.

Jones Café

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The owners of this Ontario Street café are the same that ran the now-closed Sata Sushi, which previously stood in its place. The approach remains animal-free, but the focus is now on vegan sandwiches and salads, plus smoothies, coffee, and natural wine.

Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up

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The combination of beyond-crisp coriander-garlic fries, a juicy chicken burger, and a refreshing pint of craft beer from Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up is hard to beat. From the folks behind much-loved Mile-Ex joint Dépanneur Le Pick-Up, this newer Hochelaga outpost is geared toward the evening crowd, but it keeps the original’s iconic pulled pork (and veggie alternative) sandwich on the menu.

Kazumi Sushi Lounge

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Kazumi is known for rolling some of the best sushi on this side of town. There’s all the standard sashimi, maki, and more, alongside chef specials and omakase options based on the day’s arrivals. Takeout and delivery are available, but for those planning to dine there, note that this is a BYOB (with an SAQ handily located on the same block).

La Pataterie

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Occupying a corner spot on Ontario Street for decades, La Pataterie is the leading greasy spoon for Hochelaga residents. It’s nothing fancy: just really good steamies, satisfying poutine, and vinyl seating as far as the eye can see.

Les Canailles

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Les Canailles opened in 2011, and in the time since has become a top choice for tartare, foie gras, oysters, and Mediterranean fare. Grab a seat in its warmly lit dining room, outfitted with wood tables and panelling, and choose from a menu that includes cod fritters, burrata in gazpacho, paella, and magret de canard (duck breast).

Heirloom

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Before Heirloom’s arrival, Hochelaga didn’t have much in the way of Neapolitan-style pizza. That changed thanks to chef Vincent Châtelais’s wood-fired goods, topped mainly with Italian meats and cheeses.

L'État Major

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L’État Major undoubtedly favours classic French styles and flavours (lobster bisque, the Alpine casserole tartiflette, foie gras), but isn’t afraid to take a risk or two. Take, for example, its interpretation of poutine, made with pulled pork, mustard cream, and pommes dauphines (potato puffs). Open for close to a decade, it’s a quintessential Hochelaga BYOB.

Le Flamant

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Headed by alumni from Au Pied de Cochon, Le Chien Fumant, and Fantôme, Ontario Street restaurant Le Flamant is a fantastic option for date night in Hochelaga. Expect dishes that playfully draw from international food traditions and monthly themes that keep things fresh — September’s was a crossover between the American South and India, which saw the creation of a “dosa po’ boy,” while October dished out Catalan classics like patatas bravas from the restaurant’s open kitchen.

Hélicoptère

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Hélicoptère (and its around-the-corner café sibling Hélico) wins over locals and tourists time and time again thanks to its fresh, yet comforting takes on local gastronomy. Chef and owner David Ollu honed his skills at Montreal fine dining institution Bouillon Bilk and shows them off with a menu that marries seasonal ingredients with flavours plucked from around the world.

L'Olive Noire

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Rich, classic Moroccan food abounds at this cozy spot wedged amongst the neighbourhood’s French bistros — couscous and tajines are the obvious picks, accompanied by harira soup (spiked with tomatoes and lentils) to start. This is also a BYOB.

Bagatelle

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Yes, it’s another BYOB bistro, but Bagatelle does a solid job with French classics like onion soup, foie gras, blood sausage, and tartare — salmon, tuna, or filet mignon. Come Sunday, it’s also a bustling brunch destination, conveniently located steps away from Marché Maisonneuve.

La Taqueria d'Hochlag

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Stop by La Taqueria d’Hochlag on Sainte-Catherine East for some no-nonsense tacos: The suadero (pulled beef), longaniza (spicy sausage), and carnitas (pulled pork) are all excellent. A popular takeout spot, the restaurant’s interior is sans frills, but spacious enough for casual hangs with friends.

Chez Simon Cantine Urbaine

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From sloppy smash burgers to overflowing chilli cheese fries, Simon Jodoin-Bouchard has created a menu modelled on American-style diner grub. This “cantine urbaine” quickly became a favourite after opening in February 2021 and has undoubtedly managed to draw more than a few diners to the city’s east end.

Bistro King Creole

This is the neighbourhood go-to for griot (irresistibly tender cubes of pork shoulder), fritay (an assortment of fried foods including cod fritters and plantains), and hefty plates of Haitian-spiced chicken with macaroni salad and rice. A stone’s throw from Joliette metro station, it’s one of the few dining options located beyond Promenade Ontario.

Jones Café

The owners of this Ontario Street café are the same that ran the now-closed Sata Sushi, which previously stood in its place. The approach remains animal-free, but the focus is now on vegan sandwiches and salads, plus smoothies, coffee, and natural wine.

Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up

The combination of beyond-crisp coriander-garlic fries, a juicy chicken burger, and a refreshing pint of craft beer from Resto-Bar Le Pick-Up is hard to beat. From the folks behind much-loved Mile-Ex joint Dépanneur Le Pick-Up, this newer Hochelaga outpost is geared toward the evening crowd, but it keeps the original’s iconic pulled pork (and veggie alternative) sandwich on the menu.

Kazumi Sushi Lounge

Kazumi is known for rolling some of the best sushi on this side of town. There’s all the standard sashimi, maki, and more, alongside chef specials and omakase options based on the day’s arrivals. Takeout and delivery are available, but for those planning to dine there, note that this is a BYOB (with an SAQ handily located on the same block).

La Pataterie

Occupying a corner spot on Ontario Street for decades, La Pataterie is the leading greasy spoon for Hochelaga residents. It’s nothing fancy: just really good steamies, satisfying poutine, and vinyl seating as far as the eye can see.

Les Canailles

Les Canailles opened in 2011, and in the time since has become a top choice for tartare, foie gras, oysters, and Mediterranean fare. Grab a seat in its warmly lit dining room, outfitted with wood tables and panelling, and choose from a menu that includes cod fritters, burrata in gazpacho, paella, and magret de canard (duck breast).

Heirloom

Before Heirloom’s arrival, Hochelaga didn’t have much in the way of Neapolitan-style pizza. That changed thanks to chef Vincent Châtelais’s wood-fired goods, topped mainly with Italian meats and cheeses.

L'État Major

L’État Major undoubtedly favours classic French styles and flavours (lobster bisque, the Alpine casserole tartiflette, foie gras), but isn’t afraid to take a risk or two. Take, for example, its interpretation of poutine, made with pulled pork, mustard cream, and pommes dauphines (potato puffs). Open for close to a decade, it’s a quintessential Hochelaga BYOB.

Le Flamant

Headed by alumni from Au Pied de Cochon, Le Chien Fumant, and Fantôme, Ontario Street restaurant Le Flamant is a fantastic option for date night in Hochelaga. Expect dishes that playfully draw from international food traditions and monthly themes that keep things fresh — September’s was a crossover between the American South and India, which saw the creation of a “dosa po’ boy,” while October dished out Catalan classics like patatas bravas from the restaurant’s open kitchen.

Hélicoptère

Hélicoptère (and its around-the-corner café sibling Hélico) wins over locals and tourists time and time again thanks to its fresh, yet comforting takes on local gastronomy. Chef and owner David Ollu honed his skills at Montreal fine dining institution Bouillon Bilk and shows them off with a menu that marries seasonal ingredients with flavours plucked from around the world.

L'Olive Noire

Rich, classic Moroccan food abounds at this cozy spot wedged amongst the neighbourhood’s French bistros — couscous and tajines are the obvious picks, accompanied by harira soup (spiked with tomatoes and lentils) to start. This is also a BYOB.

Bagatelle

Yes, it’s another BYOB bistro, but Bagatelle does a solid job with French classics like onion soup, foie gras, blood sausage, and tartare — salmon, tuna, or filet mignon. Come Sunday, it’s also a bustling brunch destination, conveniently located steps away from Marché Maisonneuve.

La Taqueria d'Hochlag

Stop by La Taqueria d’Hochlag on Sainte-Catherine East for some no-nonsense tacos: The suadero (pulled beef), longaniza (spicy sausage), and carnitas (pulled pork) are all excellent. A popular takeout spot, the restaurant’s interior is sans frills, but spacious enough for casual hangs with friends.

Chez Simon Cantine Urbaine

From sloppy smash burgers to overflowing chilli cheese fries, Simon Jodoin-Bouchard has created a menu modelled on American-style diner grub. This “cantine urbaine” quickly became a favourite after opening in February 2021 and has undoubtedly managed to draw more than a few diners to the city’s east end.

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