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Where to Get Takeout and Delivery in La Petite-Patrie

Cheesy pupusas, Indian snack bites, and apéro boxes north of the train tracks

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Nestled between Little Italy to the west, Villeray to the north, Rosemont to the east, and the Plateau to the south, La Petite-Patrie offers a huge variety of cuisines, including solid options for Salvadoran pupusas, Korean pajeon pancakes, Creole djon-djon rice, and more. While many of the restaurants in this neighbourhood have reopened their dining rooms since receiving the government go-ahead on June 22, reduced capacity requirements mean the takeout and delivery setups that kept them afloat in the spring are unlikely to go anywhere anytime soon.

For the purposes of this map, Eater defined La Petite-Patrie as everything between Jean-Talon and the railway tracks (north to south) and St-Denis to Papineau (west to east). Everything west of that is covered on the Little Italy and Mile-Ex map, while the Rosemont guide covers the eastern stretch.

Some venues on this list have resumed dine-in service. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as safety concerns remain. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the official sites of the Quebec government and Montreal’s public health authority (Santé Montréal). Studies indicate a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.

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Resto Los Planes

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The Salvadoran-style pupusas (thick, griddled, and stuffed masa harina corn pancakes) at Los Planes come in a variety of vegetarian or meat fillings and appear next to other Central American snacks such as tacos, enchiladas, or tamales. Diners can forego the pupusas and head straight to Los Planes’ mains, like grilled seafood or steak — make sure to order some horchata, a classic rice, cinnamon, and vanilla drink to wash it all down. All available for takeout or delivery on DoorDash.

Named after dishes in which meat and other morsels are wrapped in lettuce leaves, Ssam’s menu features staple Korean fare like bulgogi, bibimbap (including a vegetarian option), jjigae stew, mandu dumplings, and signature Korean fried chicken: regular or sweet and spicy. Those planning an end-of-season barbecue can call to reserve Ssam’s Korean BBQ Pack, including five different marinated meats with kimchi. Pick up orders at their takeout window, or order on DoorDash or UberEats.

Santa Barbara

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Brunching on the sidewalk terrasse at Santa Barbara is a ritual the denizens of La Petite-Patrie are still partaking in, but those who’d rather eat at home can take the restaurant’s fresh fare to go. Described as offering “vegetarian, vegan-forward and carnivore-friendly food,” Santa Barbara’s evening menu often features pierogies, kale salad, and gravlax — but expect slight changes on the regular.

Le Super Qualité

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The team at Le Super Qualité has mastered the art of Indian snack bar cooking with a focused subcontinental menu. The crunchy, tart, sweet dahi batata puri — tiny crisp cups made with wheat flour and filled with cubed potatoes, yogurt, chili, and a drizzle of tamarind — are ideal for sharing, though you may not want to. Call for takeout or place an order for delivery via Uber Eats.

Le P'tit Tri

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An offshoot of Plateau Japanese staple Tri Express, Le P’tit Tri is filled with antiques and great neon, and has a rotating menu of sushi, nigiri, ceviches, and salads. It’s a tiny space (seating just 11 before capacity limitations were applied), so chances are fans of the corner resto have been resorting to takeout since way before the pandemic. Now, they can place their order online.

Kwizinn Express

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If Plaza St Hubert’s ongoing infrastructure upheaval has stopped anyone from venturing to Kwizinn to pick up an excellent burger with a plantain bun and special djon-djon black mushroom rice, they can now order via UberEats. Also on offer: herring kòde patty, tassot cabrit (goat marinated with herbs and spices), and créole lambi (spicy conch meat), plus a decent selection of vegetarian options. Dishes are also available for takeout.

Bar Mamie

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Bar Mamie serves charcuterie and cheese boards composed of Québec ingredients, alongside some grandmother-approved classics like croque-monsieur and chocolate mousse at this Petite-Patrie newcomer. The menu changes regularly, and delivery isn’t an option, but they offer takeout for those who’d like to bring that bar du quartier “je ne sais quoi” back home.

Pho Tay Ho

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Steps away from Beaubien metro, this family-run outfit has served locals its deep-flavoured, slow-simmered broth with rice noodles (and piles of bean sprouts and herbs) for 25 years. The soup is the reason most come to Pho Tay Ho, but its bò tái chanh (sliced rare beef salad) and cà phê sửa nóng (coffee and condensed milk) round out the experience. Available for takeout or delivery (via UberEaters, DoorDash and SkipTheDishes).

Restaurant El Chalateco

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La Petite-Patrie is a hub for Montreal’s Latinx community and hosts many affordable, delicious Salvadoran restaurants. El Chalateco is one of the strongest, with pupusas stuffed with meat, cheese, and beans, fried yuca, and several other Central American specialties. Its no-frills dining room with Mayan murals has reopened, but takeaway and delivery (via Uber Eats and DoorDash) remain an option.

La Maison de Mademoiselle Dumpling

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The vast majority of Montreal’s worthwhile dumpling restaurants are located downtown, but there are a few outliers. Mademoiselle is one: its staff are regularly perched in the front window, hand-rolling pork, shrimp, and veggie options, which they serve by the plateful for low, low prices. Take them (and a delicious cucumber salad) to go, or order delivery via Uber Eats, as of September 10, when the restaurant reopens after being closed for renovations.

Isle de Garde

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Isle de Garde is first and foremost a microbrewery, but not the kind where the food comes as an afterthought. Instead, expect something between bar and bistro fare with options like a club sandwich with smoked salmon, spicy fried chicken, or just really good bar snacks like fries and truffle oil mayonnaise. Their terrasse and dining room are now open, but takeout (for food and canned beer) is still up for grabs for those who order on-premise.

Darna Bistroquet

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Since opening last September, Darna has been winning over locals with its Moroccan- and Mediterranean-influenced cuisine, and now it has taken takeout dining to a new high. Order one of its kefta, falafel, or merguez sandwiches, or an apéro box, featuring rghaif flatbread, radish salad, Maakouda halibut fritters, and more, directly to a favourite neighbourhood park (Jarry, Molson, and Laurier are all options), via the restaurant’s website.

Vinvinvin

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While restaurants in the city were permitted to sell wine to-go during the pandemic, bars like this one were left behind. As a result, Vinvinvin got creative with a new Sichuan takeout menu, called miam miam miam, courtesy of chef Anita Feng (formerly of Café Denise). Think silky noodles, steamed mushroom buns, and garlic, soy eggplant. Diners can get their natural wine fix on the terrasse while waiting for their order to be prepped.

La Belle Tonki

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La Belle Tonki is beloved for its riffs on the poutine, like the Kimcheesy, a mashup of fried cheese curds, a spicy cheddar ramen sauce, and kimchi, or the Dac Biet, featuring beef three ways (braised, carpaccio and meatball) and a pho-based gravy. It’s also a safe bet for vegans, who can sample most of the dishes on the menu with some slight modifications. With takeout on the rise, La Belle Tonki has started a sustainability program — after returning five clean containers, customers get two free imperial rolls. Need another reason to go?

Bo' Dégât

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The name Bo’Dégât is a witty blend of “bodega” (wine cellar in Spanish) and “beau dégât(“beautiful mess” in French). This tiny Beaubien Street eatery follows through on the latter with a mix of classic tapas, like patatas bravas and bombas de la Barceloneta (beef and pork meatballs doused in a spicy sauce), or internationally influenced options, like candied eggplant with miso or a fried calamari-stuffed bao. Picnic boxes packed with gazpacho, ham croquettes, Spanish omelet, and more are a welcome addition to its takeout and delivery offering. Available on SkipTheDishes.

Resto Los Planes

The Salvadoran-style pupusas (thick, griddled, and stuffed masa harina corn pancakes) at Los Planes come in a variety of vegetarian or meat fillings and appear next to other Central American snacks such as tacos, enchiladas, or tamales. Diners can forego the pupusas and head straight to Los Planes’ mains, like grilled seafood or steak — make sure to order some horchata, a classic rice, cinnamon, and vanilla drink to wash it all down. All available for takeout or delivery on DoorDash.

Ssam

Named after dishes in which meat and other morsels are wrapped in lettuce leaves, Ssam’s menu features staple Korean fare like bulgogi, bibimbap (including a vegetarian option), jjigae stew, mandu dumplings, and signature Korean fried chicken: regular or sweet and spicy. Those planning an end-of-season barbecue can call to reserve Ssam’s Korean BBQ Pack, including five different marinated meats with kimchi. Pick up orders at their takeout window, or order on DoorDash or UberEats.

Santa Barbara

Brunching on the sidewalk terrasse at Santa Barbara is a ritual the denizens of La Petite-Patrie are still partaking in, but those who’d rather eat at home can take the restaurant’s fresh fare to go. Described as offering “vegetarian, vegan-forward and carnivore-friendly food,” Santa Barbara’s evening menu often features pierogies, kale salad, and gravlax — but expect slight changes on the regular.

Le Super Qualité

The team at Le Super Qualité has mastered the art of Indian snack bar cooking with a focused subcontinental menu. The crunchy, tart, sweet dahi batata puri — tiny crisp cups made with wheat flour and filled with cubed potatoes, yogurt, chili, and a drizzle of tamarind — are ideal for sharing, though you may not want to. Call for takeout or place an order for delivery via Uber Eats.

Le P'tit Tri

An offshoot of Plateau Japanese staple Tri Express, Le P’tit Tri is filled with antiques and great neon, and has a rotating menu of sushi, nigiri, ceviches, and salads. It’s a tiny space (seating just 11 before capacity limitations were applied), so chances are fans of the corner resto have been resorting to takeout since way before the pandemic. Now, they can place their order online.

Kwizinn Express

If Plaza St Hubert’s ongoing infrastructure upheaval has stopped anyone from venturing to Kwizinn to pick up an excellent burger with a plantain bun and special djon-djon black mushroom rice, they can now order via UberEats. Also on offer: herring kòde patty, tassot cabrit (goat marinated with herbs and spices), and créole lambi (spicy conch meat), plus a decent selection of vegetarian options. Dishes are also available for takeout.

Bar Mamie

Bar Mamie serves charcuterie and cheese boards composed of Québec ingredients, alongside some grandmother-approved classics like croque-monsieur and chocolate mousse at this Petite-Patrie newcomer. The menu changes regularly, and delivery isn’t an option, but they offer takeout for those who’d like to bring that bar du quartier “je ne sais quoi” back home.

Pho Tay Ho

Steps away from Beaubien metro, this family-run outfit has served locals its deep-flavoured, slow-simmered broth with rice noodles (and piles of bean sprouts and herbs) for 25 years. The soup is the reason most come to Pho Tay Ho, but its bò tái chanh (sliced rare beef salad) and cà phê sửa nóng (coffee and condensed milk) round out the experience. Available for takeout or delivery (via UberEaters, DoorDash and SkipTheDishes).

Restaurant El Chalateco

La Petite-Patrie is a hub for Montreal’s Latinx community and hosts many affordable, delicious Salvadoran restaurants. El Chalateco is one of the strongest, with pupusas stuffed with meat, cheese, and beans, fried yuca, and several other Central American specialties. Its no-frills dining room with Mayan murals has reopened, but takeaway and delivery (via Uber Eats and DoorDash) remain an option.

La Maison de Mademoiselle Dumpling

The vast majority of Montreal’s worthwhile dumpling restaurants are located downtown, but there are a few outliers. Mademoiselle is one: its staff are regularly perched in the front window, hand-rolling pork, shrimp, and veggie options, which they serve by the plateful for low, low prices. Take them (and a delicious cucumber salad) to go, or order delivery via Uber Eats, as of September 10, when the restaurant reopens after being closed for renovations.

Isle de Garde

Isle de Garde is first and foremost a microbrewery, but not the kind where the food comes as an afterthought. Instead, expect something between bar and bistro fare with options like a club sandwich with smoked salmon, spicy fried chicken, or just really good bar snacks like fries and truffle oil mayonnaise. Their terrasse and dining room are now open, but takeout (for food and canned beer) is still up for grabs for those who order on-premise.

Darna Bistroquet

Since opening last September, Darna has been winning over locals with its Moroccan- and Mediterranean-influenced cuisine, and now it has taken takeout dining to a new high. Order one of its kefta, falafel, or merguez sandwiches, or an apéro box, featuring rghaif flatbread, radish salad, Maakouda halibut fritters, and more, directly to a favourite neighbourhood park (Jarry, Molson, and Laurier are all options), via the restaurant’s website.

Vinvinvin

While restaurants in the city were permitted to sell wine to-go during the pandemic, bars like this one were left behind. As a result, Vinvinvin got creative with a new Sichuan takeout menu, called miam miam miam, courtesy of chef Anita Feng (formerly of Café Denise). Think silky noodles, steamed mushroom buns, and garlic, soy eggplant. Diners can get their natural wine fix on the terrasse while waiting for their order to be prepped.

La Belle Tonki

La Belle Tonki is beloved for its riffs on the poutine, like the Kimcheesy, a mashup of fried cheese curds, a spicy cheddar ramen sauce, and kimchi, or the Dac Biet, featuring beef three ways (braised, carpaccio and meatball) and a pho-based gravy. It’s also a safe bet for vegans, who can sample most of the dishes on the menu with some slight modifications. With takeout on the rise, La Belle Tonki has started a sustainability program — after returning five clean containers, customers get two free imperial rolls. Need another reason to go?

Bo' Dégât

The name Bo’Dégât is a witty blend of “bodega” (wine cellar in Spanish) and “beau dégât(“beautiful mess” in French). This tiny Beaubien Street eatery follows through on the latter with a mix of classic tapas, like patatas bravas and bombas de la Barceloneta (beef and pork meatballs doused in a spicy sauce), or internationally influenced options, like candied eggplant with miso or a fried calamari-stuffed bao. Picnic boxes packed with gazpacho, ham croquettes, Spanish omelet, and more are a welcome addition to its takeout and delivery offering. Available on SkipTheDishes.