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Where to Eat and Drink Near Place des Arts

13 excellent bets for dining in and around Montreal’s entertainment hub, Quartier des Spectacles

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Between summertime music and comedy festivals, and wintertime art installations, Montreal’s Quartier des Spectacles — the area surrounding Place des Arts — has been known to draw a crowd. When visiting the entertainment hub, consider skipping out on the chain restaurants, and opting for some more hidden gems instead. From Japanese-Peruvian spot Tiradito to Café Parvis tucked away on Mayor Street, here are some top dining options to be had at any time of day.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Pullman

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This established wine bar offers tasting flights for the more indecisive and plenty of wines by the bottle for those looking for more than just a glass. The food menu is well-curated, with small bites ranging from olives, Quebec cheese and charcuterie to crab cakes, deer tartare, and mini bison burgers. Save room for the cinnamon churros with chocolate sauce.

Moleskine

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Neapolitan-style pizza is the focus at this Parc Avenue mainstay, with a selection of 10 different pies available at all times, including a rotating pizza of the day. A second location opened in the Time Out Market in late 2019.

Café Parvis

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Every influencer’s dream photo op, the stunning two-floor interior of Café Parvis provides a great backdrop to the creativity of its cuisine. Beyond just coffee, it also offers solid brunch, lunch, and dinner menus, with a handful of Roman-style pizzas, inventive salads, and plenty of wine. For a drink or late-night eat, head to sibling spot Bar Furco next door.

Restaurant Kamúy

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Once Agrikol closed, all eyes turned to chef Paul Toussaint’s acquisition of the space formerly held by Taverne F, adjacent to Place des Festivals. Named after the Taino word for sun, this pan-Caribbean eatery aims to create the liveliness of a traditional island market, blending together regional cuisines as well as music, art, and culture.

This Korean restaurant migrated from Mile End down to Ontario Street a few years back. Classics like pajun (seafood pancake), mandoo (dumplings) kimchi jigae, dol sot bibimbap, bulgogi, and a variety of noodles are all great options.

Bouillon Bilk

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Splurge at one of Montreal’s most notable restaurants just a stone’s throw away from Place des Arts. Located on Boulevard St-Laurent, Bouillon Bilk may be unassuming from the outside and quite minimalist on the inside, but the food coming out of François Nadon’s kitchen is show-stopping. Bouillon Bilk’s less formal younger sibling, Cadet, one block south, packs as much punch when it comes to flavour and creativity.

Bar Pamplemousse

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Quebec craft beers feature heavily on the menu at gastropub Pamplemousse, with 20 local options on tap at any given time. Come for a beer (or cocktail) and stay for the food, with Caribbean-inspired eats like jerk chicken, salt cod fritters, butter chicken pizza, and tandoori cauliflower.

Restaurant Bivouac

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This hotel restaurant is guided by a desire to acquaint diners to the world of Quebecois cuisine. Dishes are named after various regions of La Belle Province and feature everything from salmon gravlax and bison tataki to cod steak and red wine-marinated confit elk. A sizeable drinks menu is also available.

Le Central

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This upscale dining hall is a true haven for foodies. Stalls are operated by well-known names in the city, like pizzeria Heirloom, Indian snack bar Le Super Qualité, and Hawaiian-Filipino mash-up Le Petit Vibe, etc., and add to the space’s eclectic interior design. Open all day Tuesday to Saturday.

Tiradito

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If you’ve never tried Nikkei cuisine (the fusion of Japanese and Peruvian), Tiradito is a stellar introduction. Start off with a pisco sour to accompany one of their ceviches or the titular tiradito (akin to sashimi). Bring friends: the small plates are made to share.

Montreal Pool Room

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Founded in 1912, this casse-croûte (casual Quebec diner) is one of the city’s oldest restaurants, though it’s no longer in its original location. A well-known greasy spoon, it specializes in steamé hot dogs and poutine — two Quebec classics. Open until midnight daily.

La Finca

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Just down Bleury Street lies La Finca, this charming coffee shop and local marketplace serves excellent roasts and a succinct selection of eats. Soups, salads, and sandwiches are all made to order and prepped in-house daily, while a new community-driven mission is its latest endeavour.

Labo culinaire

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Located on the top floor of the Society for Arts and Technology (SAT), Labo Culinaire follows the farm-to-table philosophy, working in close collaboration with local producers to serve seasonal dishes year-round. Expect a well-curated wine list, creative cocktails, and beers from some of Quebec’s finest microbreweries rounding out the offering — and one of the city’s best rooftop terrasses come summer.

Pullman

This established wine bar offers tasting flights for the more indecisive and plenty of wines by the bottle for those looking for more than just a glass. The food menu is well-curated, with small bites ranging from olives, Quebec cheese and charcuterie to crab cakes, deer tartare, and mini bison burgers. Save room for the cinnamon churros with chocolate sauce.

Moleskine

Neapolitan-style pizza is the focus at this Parc Avenue mainstay, with a selection of 10 different pies available at all times, including a rotating pizza of the day. A second location opened in the Time Out Market in late 2019.

Café Parvis

Every influencer’s dream photo op, the stunning two-floor interior of Café Parvis provides a great backdrop to the creativity of its cuisine. Beyond just coffee, it also offers solid brunch, lunch, and dinner menus, with a handful of Roman-style pizzas, inventive salads, and plenty of wine. For a drink or late-night eat, head to sibling spot Bar Furco next door.

Restaurant Kamúy

Once Agrikol closed, all eyes turned to chef Paul Toussaint’s acquisition of the space formerly held by Taverne F, adjacent to Place des Festivals. Named after the Taino word for sun, this pan-Caribbean eatery aims to create the liveliness of a traditional island market, blending together regional cuisines as well as music, art, and culture.

Omma

This Korean restaurant migrated from Mile End down to Ontario Street a few years back. Classics like pajun (seafood pancake), mandoo (dumplings) kimchi jigae, dol sot bibimbap, bulgogi, and a variety of noodles are all great options.

Bouillon Bilk

Splurge at one of Montreal’s most notable restaurants just a stone’s throw away from Place des Arts. Located on Boulevard St-Laurent, Bouillon Bilk may be unassuming from the outside and quite minimalist on the inside, but the food coming out of François Nadon’s kitchen is show-stopping. Bouillon Bilk’s less formal younger sibling, Cadet, one block south, packs as much punch when it comes to flavour and creativity.

Bar Pamplemousse

Quebec craft beers feature heavily on the menu at gastropub Pamplemousse, with 20 local options on tap at any given time. Come for a beer (or cocktail) and stay for the food, with Caribbean-inspired eats like jerk chicken, salt cod fritters, butter chicken pizza, and tandoori cauliflower.

Restaurant Bivouac

This hotel restaurant is guided by a desire to acquaint diners to the world of Quebecois cuisine. Dishes are named after various regions of La Belle Province and feature everything from salmon gravlax and bison tataki to cod steak and red wine-marinated confit elk. A sizeable drinks menu is also available.

Le Central

This upscale dining hall is a true haven for foodies. Stalls are operated by well-known names in the city, like pizzeria Heirloom, Indian snack bar Le Super Qualité, and Hawaiian-Filipino mash-up Le Petit Vibe, etc., and add to the space’s eclectic interior design. Open all day Tuesday to Saturday.

Tiradito

If you’ve never tried Nikkei cuisine (the fusion of Japanese and Peruvian), Tiradito is a stellar introduction. Start off with a pisco sour to accompany one of their ceviches or the titular tiradito (akin to sashimi). Bring friends: the small plates are made to share.

Montreal Pool Room

Founded in 1912, this casse-croûte (casual Quebec diner) is one of the city’s oldest restaurants, though it’s no longer in its original location. A well-known greasy spoon, it specializes in steamé hot dogs and poutine — two Quebec classics. Open until midnight daily.

La Finca

Just down Bleury Street lies La Finca, this charming coffee shop and local marketplace serves excellent roasts and a succinct selection of eats. Soups, salads, and sandwiches are all made to order and prepped in-house daily, while a new community-driven mission is its latest endeavour.

Labo culinaire

Located on the top floor of the Society for Arts and Technology (SAT), Labo Culinaire follows the farm-to-table philosophy, working in close collaboration with local producers to serve seasonal dishes year-round. Expect a well-curated wine list, creative cocktails, and beers from some of Quebec’s finest microbreweries rounding out the offering — and one of the city’s best rooftop terrasses come summer.

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