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11 Essential Restaurants for Fish and Seafood in Montreal

From oysters to urchin, whole grilled fish and more

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No shade to meat and potatoes, but sunny season calls for the briny, fresh offerings of the ocean. Whether you’re looking for sashimi, lobster, grilled octopus, cod croquettes, fish and chips, clams, oysters, or an impressively-seared piece of fish with crispy skin, Montreal has got you covered. We may not be on the coast, but restaurants here do have an excellent supply chain of seafood from the Gaspésie and eastern Canada.

Note that the restaurants on this map are arranged from north to south, and aren’t ranked.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Solymar

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This Peruvian place high up on St-Hubert has a huge range of seafood options: ten different mussel dishes, avocado stuffed with shrimp, seven ceviches complete with leche de tigre (literally “tiger’s milk”, which contains no dairy despite what its name may suggest), seafood soups, fried seafood of all kinds, plus grouper, trout, and sole platters.

Comptoir 21

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Despite the city’s love for all things beige and fried, good fish and chips aren’t that easy to find in Montreal. However, this beloved Mile End restaurant — now expanded, with locations in Verdun and the Plateau — has you covered. There’s a fish and chips trio option, where golden battered cod comes with sides of fries and salad.

Estiatorio Milos

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For upscale Greek food, Milos is in a league of its own, and their seafood offerings are some of the best of any restaurant in Montreal. Standouts include whole fish sashimi, salt baked sea bass, fresh oysters and the much-loved lobster spaghetti.

Mythos Ouzeri

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Greeks know their seafood, and Mythos’s grilled octopus proves it. If, you’re not in the mood for octopus, the charcoal grilled squid stuffed with kefalotyri cheese is another great option. On weekend evenings, live music gives way to Greek dancing well into the night.

Boca Iberica

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The menu here is composed mostly of tapas, and said tapas highlight the Iberian Peninsula’s seafood offerings. Try the octopus salad, mackerel tartare, cod croquettes, or the saffron and sambuca scallops.

La Sirène de la Mer

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This family restaurant in TMR has been open for twenty years, offering Mediterranean-style seafood dishes that are consistently good and fresh: grilled octopus, fried calamari, mussels in white wine and grilled fish. They also operate a fish market out of an adjoining space.

Le Bremner

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Chuck Hughes’ second restaurant prides itself on its seafood, from whole fish to dressed-up crudos, fresh oysters, crab, urchin and more. The tuna sashimi with tahini is a surprising but delicious combination, and makes a great choice for a starter.

Restaurant Keung Kee

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Seafood is the thing to order at this Cantonese restaurant in Chinatown: steamed razor clams with soy and garlic sauce, scallops on the half-shell with glass noodles, baked lobster with ginger and onions, clams in black bean sauce, salt and pepper squid and king crab bigger than your head. Try to order ahead of time; they tend to run out of the favourites early on.

Poissonnerie & Restaurant Rayan

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Come to this Côte-des-Neiges gem expecting some of the city’s freshest fish and seafood; do not come expecting ambiance. It’s a cafeteria-style set up, where customers order from the fish counter at the back of the restaurant and seat themselves (along with a table number) at the front. Don’t miss the perfectly tender grilled octopus.

Antonio Park’s sashimi platters and omakase menus are works of art, and the restaurant’s seafood and fish of the day options rarely disappoint. Popular, yes. High-end, also yes. But a must for sashimi in this city.

Lucille’s Oyster Dive

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Lucille’s Oyster Dive has become synonymous with seafood in Montreal. Despite the name, it’s not really very divey at all (it’s actually a little on the pricy side), but outstanding oysters are definitely the star of the menu. The lobster roll is also a good bet, as are steamers and tartares.

Solymar

This Peruvian place high up on St-Hubert has a huge range of seafood options: ten different mussel dishes, avocado stuffed with shrimp, seven ceviches complete with leche de tigre (literally “tiger’s milk”, which contains no dairy despite what its name may suggest), seafood soups, fried seafood of all kinds, plus grouper, trout, and sole platters.

Comptoir 21

Despite the city’s love for all things beige and fried, good fish and chips aren’t that easy to find in Montreal. However, this beloved Mile End restaurant — now expanded, with locations in Verdun and the Plateau — has you covered. There’s a fish and chips trio option, where golden battered cod comes with sides of fries and salad.

Estiatorio Milos

For upscale Greek food, Milos is in a league of its own, and their seafood offerings are some of the best of any restaurant in Montreal. Standouts include whole fish sashimi, salt baked sea bass, fresh oysters and the much-loved lobster spaghetti.

Mythos Ouzeri

Greeks know their seafood, and Mythos’s grilled octopus proves it. If, you’re not in the mood for octopus, the charcoal grilled squid stuffed with kefalotyri cheese is another great option. On weekend evenings, live music gives way to Greek dancing well into the night.

Boca Iberica

The menu here is composed mostly of tapas, and said tapas highlight the Iberian Peninsula’s seafood offerings. Try the octopus salad, mackerel tartare, cod croquettes, or the saffron and sambuca scallops.

La Sirène de la Mer

This family restaurant in TMR has been open for twenty years, offering Mediterranean-style seafood dishes that are consistently good and fresh: grilled octopus, fried calamari, mussels in white wine and grilled fish. They also operate a fish market out of an adjoining space.

Le Bremner

Chuck Hughes’ second restaurant prides itself on its seafood, from whole fish to dressed-up crudos, fresh oysters, crab, urchin and more. The tuna sashimi with tahini is a surprising but delicious combination, and makes a great choice for a starter.

Restaurant Keung Kee

Seafood is the thing to order at this Cantonese restaurant in Chinatown: steamed razor clams with soy and garlic sauce, scallops on the half-shell with glass noodles, baked lobster with ginger and onions, clams in black bean sauce, salt and pepper squid and king crab bigger than your head. Try to order ahead of time; they tend to run out of the favourites early on.

Poissonnerie & Restaurant Rayan

Come to this Côte-des-Neiges gem expecting some of the city’s freshest fish and seafood; do not come expecting ambiance. It’s a cafeteria-style set up, where customers order from the fish counter at the back of the restaurant and seat themselves (along with a table number) at the front. Don’t miss the perfectly tender grilled octopus.

Park

Antonio Park’s sashimi platters and omakase menus are works of art, and the restaurant’s seafood and fish of the day options rarely disappoint. Popular, yes. High-end, also yes. But a must for sashimi in this city.

Lucille’s Oyster Dive

Lucille’s Oyster Dive has become synonymous with seafood in Montreal. Despite the name, it’s not really very divey at all (it’s actually a little on the pricy side), but outstanding oysters are definitely the star of the menu. The lobster roll is also a good bet, as are steamers and tartares.

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