clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
person cutting sushi on wooden-looking board covered in slabs of fish
Hidden Fish is one of Downton Montreal’s newest sushi spots.
Hidden Fish

16 Must-Try Montreal Sushi Restaurants

The places to go for luxe omakase, stunning platters of sashimi, and colourful vegan rolls

View as Map
Hidden Fish is one of Downton Montreal’s newest sushi spots.
| Hidden Fish

Montreal isn’t famous for its nori-wrapped morsels, and for a long time, it lacked the destination-worthy sushi spots seen in other major cities. But thanks to figures like Junichi Ikematsu and Antonio Park, that’s changed. On this map, their restaurants (both eponymously named) are joined by some new arrivals and some neighbourhood gems — all reliable purveyors of sashimi and maki.

From luxe omakase spots working with wild fish to takeout counters adopting traditional preparation techniques, here’s a range of standout options — at all price points.

Want some other Japanese dishes with your sushi? Check out our ramen and izakaya maps.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
If you book a reservation through an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Mile End favourite Yuukai is known for the freshness of the fish on its compact menu. Try the tuna tatami, the tuna deluxe (with fried onions, shisho leaf, and a basil and teriyaki sauce), or explore the special omakase platter for two.

Kazumi Sushi Lounge

Copy Link

Along with standard sushi fare, this east-end restaurant features ni-anago (saltwater eel) prepared in a classic Edomae style — its detailed menu is a must-read on Japanese raw fish traditions. Meanwhile, Kazumi’s location, between a pet store and an optometrist in a Sherbrooke Street strip mall, belies the elegance that lies behind its door.

Tri Express

Copy Link

One of the most beloved sushi chefs in Montreal, Trì Dư has cultivated a loyal following of admirers after spells at Kaizen, Treehouse, Le Petit Treehouse, and for the past decade, at his own Tri Express in the Plateau. There’s also a newer, more casual second location further north, on Saint-Zotique.

Otto Bistro

Copy Link

So much more than a sushi bar, chef Hiroshi Kitano’s tiny kitchen offers a daily sashimi selection, chirashi, and don rice bowls with maguro and shiso leaf. Don’t miss out on the chef’s mazemen (no-broth ramen), one of the highlights of his carefully constructed menu.

Saint Sushi (multiple locations)

Copy Link

The names of the dishes at Saint Sushi might seem silly, but it’s easy to overlook once the fresh fish hits the table. Some more creative items served with yogurt sauce may not be for everyone, but its “Christmas trees” — sashimi tartare on crackers — are guaranteed to be a hit.

Chef Junichi Ikematsu is arguably the OG of Montreal sushi chefs. His Mile End restaurant has been a model of consistency since 2005, nabbing him some rare five-star reviews from local critics along the way. Expect an upscale ambiance with sushi to match, though next-door Ôkini (a side project Ikematsu launched in 2020) is perfect for something more grab-and-go.

Sushi Momo

Copy Link

Christian Manuel Ventura Alatorre’s all-vegan Plateau sushi venture garnered plentiful praise upon opening in 2014, and its crafty veggie rolls continue to present tough competition to even the most reputable fish-based spots in the city. Delivery in the neighbourhood with Chasseurs Courrier makes this a super eco-friendly choice. 

Fleurs & Cadeaux

Copy Link

One of Chinatown’s newest businesses, this snack and sake bar holds court in a heritage building that was formerly a flower and gift shop. In addition to yakitori and noodles, chef Tetsuya Shimizu whips up chirashi bowls, hand rolls, and sashimi, with a range of natural sakes and wines on the side.

Ryú (multiple locations)

Copy Link

With three outlets across the city, Ryú’s quality rolls and refined presentation are more accessible than ever. It also has a spin-off ghost kitchen operation called Sushi Dept, which offers a concise menu with more bento-ish options and lower price points.

Hidden Fish Sushi

Copy Link

Chef Haruo Ogrura helms the kitchen at this new downtown sushi destination, bringing more than three decades of experience with him. Gear up for an assortment of stunning sashimi and creative maki, like the restaurant’s namesake Hidden Fish roll, made with bluefin toro, burdock root, foie gras, and plum paste.

Sushi Okeya Kyujiro

Copy Link

After seeing a performance of Cirque du Soleil, chef Takuya Matsuda knew he wanted to put on a similarly enthralling show for diners, demonstrating Japanese cooking techniques from an open kitchen. Kimono-clad servers and approximately 20 courses (mostly sushi) are offered at this downtown omakase restaurant — with upscale prices to match.

Sushi Bar Kim

Copy Link

A well-kept secret in the heart of Westmount, Sushi Bar Kim can be found in the food court area on the lower level of Westmount Square. It has a range of maki, nigiri, and sashimi, including rolls wrapped in rice paper.

Maiko Sushi

Copy Link

The West Island has several decent sushi options, but Maiko has amassed what is likely the most significant following. Its long menu of maki and sashimi — and so much else (think filet mignon and rack of lamb) — has kept locals coming back since 2003.

Le Kioko

Copy Link

St-Henri’s Le Kioko has made a name for itself with artfully prepared sushi, tartare, and poke. It’s a casual neighbourhood nook, open for lunch daily — except on Sundays.

A native of Argentina and a Culinary Institute of Japan alum Antonio Park has risen to become one of Canada’s most recognizable chefs. His eponymous sushi restaurant in Westmount is one of the pricier options on this map, but the offering is high-quality and fit for the most special of occasions. Open Tuesday to Saturday for lunch, dinner, and all-day takeout.

Restaurant Shoji Sushi

Copy Link

With fish dry-aged in-house, St. Lambert’s Shoji features sushi varieties not commonly found on the island, plus many of the classics. Privately imported wines add more interest to an already unique offering.

Yuukai

Mile End favourite Yuukai is known for the freshness of the fish on its compact menu. Try the tuna tatami, the tuna deluxe (with fried onions, shisho leaf, and a basil and teriyaki sauce), or explore the special omakase platter for two.

Kazumi Sushi Lounge

Along with standard sushi fare, this east-end restaurant features ni-anago (saltwater eel) prepared in a classic Edomae style — its detailed menu is a must-read on Japanese raw fish traditions. Meanwhile, Kazumi’s location, between a pet store and an optometrist in a Sherbrooke Street strip mall, belies the elegance that lies behind its door.

Tri Express

One of the most beloved sushi chefs in Montreal, Trì Dư has cultivated a loyal following of admirers after spells at Kaizen, Treehouse, Le Petit Treehouse, and for the past decade, at his own Tri Express in the Plateau. There’s also a newer, more casual second location further north, on Saint-Zotique.

Otto Bistro

So much more than a sushi bar, chef Hiroshi Kitano’s tiny kitchen offers a daily sashimi selection, chirashi, and don rice bowls with maguro and shiso leaf. Don’t miss out on the chef’s mazemen (no-broth ramen), one of the highlights of his carefully constructed menu.

Saint Sushi (multiple locations)

The names of the dishes at Saint Sushi might seem silly, but it’s easy to overlook once the fresh fish hits the table. Some more creative items served with yogurt sauce may not be for everyone, but its “Christmas trees” — sashimi tartare on crackers — are guaranteed to be a hit.

Jun I

Chef Junichi Ikematsu is arguably the OG of Montreal sushi chefs. His Mile End restaurant has been a model of consistency since 2005, nabbing him some rare five-star reviews from local critics along the way. Expect an upscale ambiance with sushi to match, though next-door Ôkini (a side project Ikematsu launched in 2020) is perfect for something more grab-and-go.

Sushi Momo

Christian Manuel Ventura Alatorre’s all-vegan Plateau sushi venture garnered plentiful praise upon opening in 2014, and its crafty veggie rolls continue to present tough competition to even the most reputable fish-based spots in the city. Delivery in the neighbourhood with Chasseurs Courrier makes this a super eco-friendly choice. 

Fleurs & Cadeaux

One of Chinatown’s newest businesses, this snack and sake bar holds court in a heritage building that was formerly a flower and gift shop. In addition to yakitori and noodles, chef Tetsuya Shimizu whips up chirashi bowls, hand rolls, and sashimi, with a range of natural sakes and wines on the side.

Ryú (multiple locations)

With three outlets across the city, Ryú’s quality rolls and refined presentation are more accessible than ever. It also has a spin-off ghost kitchen operation called Sushi Dept, which offers a concise menu with more bento-ish options and lower price points.

Hidden Fish Sushi

Chef Haruo Ogrura helms the kitchen at this new downtown sushi destination, bringing more than three decades of experience with him. Gear up for an assortment of stunning sashimi and creative maki, like the restaurant’s namesake Hidden Fish roll, made with bluefin toro, burdock root, foie gras, and plum paste.

Sushi Okeya Kyujiro

After seeing a performance of Cirque du Soleil, chef Takuya Matsuda knew he wanted to put on a similarly enthralling show for diners, demonstrating Japanese cooking techniques from an open kitchen. Kimono-clad servers and approximately 20 courses (mostly sushi) are offered at this downtown omakase restaurant — with upscale prices to match.

Sushi Bar Kim

A well-kept secret in the heart of Westmount, Sushi Bar Kim can be found in the food court area on the lower level of Westmount Square. It has a range of maki, nigiri, and sashimi, including rolls wrapped in rice paper.

Maiko Sushi

The West Island has several decent sushi options, but Maiko has amassed what is likely the most significant following. Its long menu of maki and sashimi — and so much else (think filet mignon and rack of lamb) — has kept locals coming back since 2003.

Le Kioko

St-Henri’s Le Kioko has made a name for itself with artfully prepared sushi, tartare, and poke. It’s a casual neighbourhood nook, open for lunch daily — except on Sundays.

Park

A native of Argentina and a Culinary Institute of Japan alum Antonio Park has risen to become one of Canada’s most recognizable chefs. His eponymous sushi restaurant in Westmount is one of the pricier options on this map, but the offering is high-quality and fit for the most special of occasions. Open Tuesday to Saturday for lunch, dinner, and all-day takeout.

Related Maps

Restaurant Shoji Sushi

With fish dry-aged in-house, St. Lambert’s Shoji features sushi varieties not commonly found on the island, plus many of the classics. Privately imported wines add more interest to an already unique offering.

Related Maps