clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
strawberry tart with leafy green background Pâtisserie Madeleine

Where to Get Outstanding Pastries and Baked Goods in Montreal

All the chocolate babka, sticky cinnamon rolls, and fruity tarts you could ever need

View as Map

It should come as no surprise that good pastries and viennoiseries aren’t hard to come by in a city with plenty of connections to France. But an impressive variety of non-French options are also on the table. Need something Jewish like rugelach or babka? Hit up Hof Kelsten or Cheskies. Italian cannoli? Get some of the best at Alati Caserta in Little Italy.

This map focuses on pastries and sweet treats. If you’re looking for great bread, that’s on a separate map over here (though many of the spots listed below make their own). Croissants get their own guide, and so do pies and doughnuts.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

La Bête à Pain (multiple locations)

Copy Link

After opening market-driven bistro hit Le St-Urbain in 2008, chef Marc-André Royal decided to gift Ahuntsic yet another gem: bakery La Bête à Pain. Now with additional locations in Griffintown and Laval, the bakery’s stellar bread, delicious raspberry and blueberry financiers, and almond-topped Paris-Brest are never too far afield.

Pâtisserie Mahrouse

Copy Link

One of Montreal’s most popular Middle Eastern bakeries, Pâtisserie Mahrousé has been around since 1975. In that time, it’s become a favourite for its wide assortment of baklava, as well as halawet el jibn (sweet cheese rolls), ma’amoul (shortbread cookies stuffed with dates, walnuts, or pistachios), and zalabia (fried dough).

Boulangerie Jarry

Copy Link

Although bread is the specialty here (and the bakery mills its own flour on-site), this new Villeray spot also offers sweeter options like chocolatine and a selection of cookies. Be sure to grab a baguette or a loaf before leaving.

Afroditi

Copy Link

This linchpin Parc-Ex bakery has served Montreal’s Greek community since 1971. It’s a family-run operation beloved for its plethora of sweet and savoury phyllo classics — and decorated cakes for special occasions.

Louise Boulangerie

Copy Link

With careful attention to detail, this minimalist bakery on the main drag of Little Italy serves stunning tarts and other pastries alongside fresh bread all day long — a good option if you aren’t an early riser.

Alati Caserta

Copy Link

A stone’s throw away from the Jean-Talon Market, Little Italy’s Alati Caserta has been around for over five decades and remains in the family. Amaretti cookies, tiramisu, bomboloni, sfogliatelle, and a slew of other Italian pastries line Alati Caserta’s display cases, but its cannoli — as you might’ve heard — are the stuff of legend.

Pâtisserie Rosário

Copy Link

All types of sweet Portuguese treats are on offer at over-40-year-old Rosário, including pastéis de feijão (bean and almond tarts) and bolas de berlim (fried dough balls filled with egg custard). Just make sure not to leave without a pastel de nata (a traditional custard-filled tart with a scorched, caramelized top) — theirs are arguably the finest in the city. Once an institution on the Plateau, Rosário now calls Plaza St-Hubert home.

Pâtisserie Madeleine

Copy Link

Elegant and imaginative French pastries abound at this Beaubien Street shop. Run by French couple Vincent Clément and Lucile Devert, Patisserie Madeleine serves haskap and lavender tartlets; lime, cucumber, and mint éclairs; and for something more savoury, a cheese and miso croissant. Be sure not to leave without one of its close-to-perfect madeleines.

La Cornetteria

Copy Link

This Little Italy bakery’s namesake is the cornetto, a traditional, stuffed croissant-like pastry. But it is also well-known for the cronetto: a cronut and bombolone hybrid with flavours ranging from Nutella to strawberry cream. Tarts, cannoli, and other delicious Italian pastries are also on offer.

Automne Boulangerie

Copy Link

When Seth Gabrielse and Julien Roy decided to open Automne Boulangerie together, they wanted to do it right — and oh, did they deliver. Working with local grains and long fermentation times, their bread is as good as it gets, and the same goes for its pastries and sweets, with its chocolatine and cinnamon bun being particular standouts.

Café Dei Campi

Copy Link

Vegan bake shops are gaining steam in Montreal, but you’d be hard-pressed to find much better than Café Dei Campi. The team keeps things interesting with a rotating offering that has in the past included options like berry-filled puff pastry, pistachio brioche, and strawberry rhubarb crostata. (Note: Café Dei Campi recently moved from Rosemont to Chabot Street, but hasn’t yet completed renovations; it continues to take weekly pre-orders and sells a limited offering on-site.)

Boulangerie Cheskie

Copy Link

Piles of rugelach are displayed in the window of Montreal’s go-to kosher bakery but don’t be compelled to stop there when ordering. This twenty-year-old establishment started by New Yorker Cheskie Lebowitz makes some of the most outstanding chocolatey babka in town, plus black-and-white cookies, cheese crowns, and more.

Pâtisserie Rhubarbe

Copy Link

Adorable Rhubarbe, headed by pastry pro Stéphanie Labelle, excels at all flakey pastries and seasonal desserts — and they’re all devastatingly gorgeous. The offering rotates, but visitors can expect options like mille-feuilles, éclairs, fruity layered cakes, and creative spins on the pavlova, such as rhubarb and wild rose version or one made with black tea and bergamot.

Guillaume

Copy Link

With his sourdough loaves, olive ciabatta, and fig-cheddar buns, Guillaume Vaillant is a frontrunner on the Montreal bread circuit. But the apple turnovers and “Reine Elizabeth” (a small date cupcake with a coconut-caramel topping) at his eponymously named shop easily satisfy those with a sweet tooth, too.

Hof Kelsten

Copy Link

Baker Jeffrey Finkelstein first made a name for himself with challah, babka, and other Jewish baked goods. It turns out he knows his way around non-Jewish classics, too: Hof Kelsten’s flakey, buttery croissants and lovely holiday panettone are some of the most sought-after in the city.

Au Kouign-Amann

Copy Link

Normandy-trained patissier Nicholas Henri keeps a minuscule menu, laser-focused on churning out the city’s finest kouign-amann. Roughly translating to “butter cake,” the house specialty can be described as slightly caramelized croissants doubled over on themselves. Oh, and their croissants — at just $1.65 each — are also among the city’s best.

La Meunerie Urbaine

Copy Link

NDG might not have as many bakeries as other Montreal neighbourhoods, but what it lacks in quantity, it makes up for in quality. Pro baker Martin Falardeau’s La Meunerie flies somewhat under the radar, but it’s home to an award-winning baguette and some delicious éclairs and mille-feuilles.

Café Bazin

Copy Link

Bertrand Bazin’s namesake Westmount address is a collaboration between the renowned pastry chef and local restaurateur Antonio Park. It’s the perfect place to stop for a coffee and croissant or to pick up some treats when on the west side of town — but there’s no promise they’ll make it home intact.

Arhoma (multiple locations)

Copy Link

All types of pastries filled with praline, airy mousse or fruit are available alongside a cornucopia of bread for the Hochelaga masses at the neighbourhood’s most popular bakery. There’s another location over on the corner of Papineau and Ontario.

Patisserie Polonaise Wawel (multiple locations)

Copy Link

This Polish bake shop has been churning out poppy seed and cheese strudels, plum and apricot paczki, and an assortment of other sweets for years. It’s also an excellent spot for charcuterie, ready-made sandwiches, and imported goods.

Sachère Desserts

Copy Link

Pastry expert Sonya Sammut dazzles with well-crafted, Japanese-influenced desserts at her adorable Village shop, which caters to vegan and gluten-free diets. Expect daily tarts, seasonal desserts, like a hibiscus, raspberry, mascarpone cake, and packaged matcha shortcake and hojicha tiramisu, plus an impressive offering of cakes made to order. As if that wasn’t enough, she’s also making some of the best soft-serve ice cream in town.

Patisserie Harmonie

Copy Link

A Chinatown staple since 2008, Harmonie pumps out signature sweets like Hong Kong-style egg tarts, mooncakes, and sesame buns filled with sweet red bean paste. This is the place for desserts that combine sweet and savoury and are affordably priced.

Boulangerie Le Toledo

Copy Link

Winner of Montreal’s best baguette in 2020, this Plateau bakery is also a popular destination for pastries — think choquettes (French pastry sugar puffs), Gâteau Basque (a traditional sweet from the Northern Basque region of France), and a rotation of seasonal fruit tarts. It’s a great place for people-watching, especially during the summer when Mont-Royal Avenue becomes pedestrian-only.

Bernice

Copy Link

On the western edge of St-Henri lies bakery-café Bernice, specializing in layered cakes and some of the most decadent cookies around. Its luminous interior makes for a delightful place to take a seat and savour a sweet, but you can also grab your coffee and snack to go.

Arte & Farina

Copy Link

Newly relocated to a sleek space on Ste-Catherine Street East, Arte & Farine continues to whip up some excellent bomboloni, focaccia, jammy tarts, and tons of other baked Italian goods, including an exquisite panettone around the holidays.

Patrice Pâtissier

Copy Link

Once dubbed the best pastry chef in the province, Patrice Demers occasionally mixes fanciful flavours into a roster of otherwise classic French pastries. From éclairs and kouign-amann to lemon tartlets and canelé, it’s all worth trying — just make sure to do so before it closes its doors for good at the end of the summer.

Chez Potier

Copy Link

In one of the latest additions to the ever-changing Cité du Multimédia area, pastry chef Olivier Potier opened up shop in 2021. He’s offering everything from delicately made cakes to a delightful kouglof (a traditional Alsatian brioche), savoury pastries, gourmet grocery items, and takeout dishes out of a ground floor space on Wellington Street.

Audacieuse Vanille

Copy Link

Everything on the menu at Audacieuse Vanielle is close to perfect, though we’re willing to bet you’ll struggle to decide what to eat. Consider its signature carrot cake, its earl grey and orange blossom bundt, or perhaps a frangipane and cranberry tart. Whatever you choose, it’ll be gluten-free, vegan, and soy-free.

La Bête à Pain (multiple locations)

After opening market-driven bistro hit Le St-Urbain in 2008, chef Marc-André Royal decided to gift Ahuntsic yet another gem: bakery La Bête à Pain. Now with additional locations in Griffintown and Laval, the bakery’s stellar bread, delicious raspberry and blueberry financiers, and almond-topped Paris-Brest are never too far afield.

Pâtisserie Mahrouse

One of Montreal’s most popular Middle Eastern bakeries, Pâtisserie Mahrousé has been around since 1975. In that time, it’s become a favourite for its wide assortment of baklava, as well as halawet el jibn (sweet cheese rolls), ma’amoul (shortbread cookies stuffed with dates, walnuts, or pistachios), and zalabia (fried dough).

Boulangerie Jarry

Although bread is the specialty here (and the bakery mills its own flour on-site), this new Villeray spot also offers sweeter options like chocolatine and a selection of cookies. Be sure to grab a baguette or a loaf before leaving.

Afroditi

This linchpin Parc-Ex bakery has served Montreal’s Greek community since 1971. It’s a family-run operation beloved for its plethora of sweet and savoury phyllo classics — and decorated cakes for special occasions.

Louise Boulangerie

With careful attention to detail, this minimalist bakery on the main drag of Little Italy serves stunning tarts and other pastries alongside fresh bread all day long — a good option if you aren’t an early riser.

Alati Caserta

A stone’s throw away from the Jean-Talon Market, Little Italy’s Alati Caserta has been around for over five decades and remains in the family. Amaretti cookies, tiramisu, bomboloni, sfogliatelle, and a slew of other Italian pastries line Alati Caserta’s display cases, but its cannoli — as you might’ve heard — are the stuff of legend.

Pâtisserie Rosário

All types of sweet Portuguese treats are on offer at over-40-year-old Rosário, including pastéis de feijão (bean and almond tarts) and bolas de berlim (fried dough balls filled with egg custard). Just make sure not to leave without a pastel de nata (a traditional custard-filled tart with a scorched, caramelized top) — theirs are arguably the finest in the city. Once an institution on the Plateau, Rosário now calls Plaza St-Hubert home.

Pâtisserie Madeleine

Elegant and imaginative French pastries abound at this Beaubien Street shop. Run by French couple Vincent Clément and Lucile Devert, Patisserie Madeleine serves haskap and lavender tartlets; lime, cucumber, and mint éclairs; and for something more savoury, a cheese and miso croissant. Be sure not to leave without one of its close-to-perfect madeleines.

La Cornetteria

This Little Italy bakery’s namesake is the cornetto, a traditional, stuffed croissant-like pastry. But it is also well-known for the cronetto: a cronut and bombolone hybrid with flavours ranging from Nutella to strawberry cream. Tarts, cannoli, and other delicious Italian pastries are also on offer.

Automne Boulangerie

When Seth Gabrielse and Julien Roy decided to open Automne Boulangerie together, they wanted to do it right — and oh, did they deliver. Working with local grains and long fermentation times, their bread is as good as it gets, and the same goes for its pastries and sweets, with its chocolatine and cinnamon bun being particular standouts.

Café Dei Campi

Vegan bake shops are gaining steam in Montreal, but you’d be hard-pressed to find much better than Café Dei Campi. The team keeps things interesting with a rotating offering that has in the past included options like berry-filled puff pastry, pistachio brioche, and strawberry rhubarb crostata. (Note: Café Dei Campi recently moved from Rosemont to Chabot Street, but hasn’t yet completed renovations; it continues to take weekly pre-orders and sells a limited offering on-site.)

Boulangerie Cheskie

Piles of rugelach are displayed in the window of Montreal’s go-to kosher bakery but don’t be compelled to stop there when ordering. This twenty-year-old establishment started by New Yorker Cheskie Lebowitz makes some of the most outstanding chocolatey babka in town, plus black-and-white cookies, cheese crowns, and more.

Pâtisserie Rhubarbe

Adorable Rhubarbe, headed by pastry pro Stéphanie Labelle, excels at all flakey pastries and seasonal desserts — and they’re all devastatingly gorgeous. The offering rotates, but visitors can expect options like mille-feuilles, éclairs, fruity layered cakes, and creative spins on the pavlova, such as rhubarb and wild rose version or one made with black tea and bergamot.

Guillaume

With his sourdough loaves, olive ciabatta, and fig-cheddar buns, Guillaume Vaillant is a frontrunner on the Montreal bread circuit. But the apple turnovers and “Reine Elizabeth” (a small date cupcake with a coconut-caramel topping) at his eponymously named shop easily satisfy those with a sweet tooth, too.

Hof Kelsten

Baker Jeffrey Finkelstein first made a name for himself with challah, babka, and other Jewish baked goods. It turns out he knows his way around non-Jewish classics, too: Hof Kelsten’s flakey, buttery croissants and lovely holiday panettone are some of the most sought-after in the city.

Related Maps

Au Kouign-Amann

Normandy-trained patissier Nicholas Henri keeps a minuscule menu, laser-focused on churning out the city’s finest kouign-amann. Roughly translating to “butter cake,” the house specialty can be described as slightly caramelized croissants doubled over on themselves. Oh, and their croissants — at just $1.65 each — are also among the city’s best.

La Meunerie Urbaine

NDG might not have as many bakeries as other Montreal neighbourhoods, but what it lacks in quantity, it makes up for in quality. Pro baker Martin Falardeau’s La Meunerie flies somewhat under the radar, but it’s home to an award-winning baguette and some delicious éclairs and mille-feuilles.

Café Bazin

Bertrand Bazin’s namesake Westmount address is a collaboration between the renowned pastry chef and local restaurateur Antonio Park. It’s the perfect place to stop for a coffee and croissant or to pick up some treats when on the west side of town — but there’s no promise they’ll make it home intact.

Arhoma (multiple locations)

All types of pastries filled with praline, airy mousse or fruit are available alongside a cornucopia of bread for the Hochelaga masses at the neighbourhood’s most popular bakery. There’s another location over on the corner of Papineau and Ontario.

Patisserie Polonaise Wawel (multiple locations)

This Polish bake shop has been churning out poppy seed and cheese strudels, plum and apricot paczki, and an assortment of other sweets for years. It’s also an excellent spot for charcuterie, ready-made sandwiches, and imported goods.

Sachère Desserts

Pastry expert Sonya Sammut dazzles with well-crafted, Japanese-influenced desserts at her adorable Village shop, which caters to vegan and gluten-free diets. Expect daily tarts, seasonal desserts, like a hibiscus, raspberry, mascarpone cake, and packaged matcha shortcake and hojicha tiramisu, plus an impressive offering of cakes made to order. As if that wasn’t enough, she’s also making some of the best soft-serve ice cream in town.

Patisserie Harmonie

A Chinatown staple since 2008, Harmonie pumps out signature sweets like Hong Kong-style egg tarts, mooncakes, and sesame buns filled with sweet red bean paste. This is the place for desserts that combine sweet and savoury and are affordably priced.

Boulangerie Le Toledo

Winner of Montreal’s best baguette in 2020, this Plateau bakery is also a popular destination for pastries — think choquettes (French pastry sugar puffs), Gâteau Basque (a traditional sweet from the Northern Basque region of France), and a rotation of seasonal fruit tarts. It’s a great place for people-watching, especially during the summer when Mont-Royal Avenue becomes pedestrian-only.

Bernice

On the western edge of St-Henri lies bakery-café Bernice, specializing in layered cakes and some of the most decadent cookies around. Its luminous interior makes for a delightful place to take a seat and savour a sweet, but you can also grab your coffee and snack to go.

Arte & Farina

Newly relocated to a sleek space on Ste-Catherine Street East, Arte & Farine continues to whip up some excellent bomboloni, focaccia, jammy tarts, and tons of other baked Italian goods, including an exquisite panettone around the holidays.

Patrice Pâtissier

Once dubbed the best pastry chef in the province, Patrice Demers occasionally mixes fanciful flavours into a roster of otherwise classic French pastries. From éclairs and kouign-amann to lemon tartlets and canelé, it’s all worth trying — just make sure to do so before it closes its doors for good at the end of the summer.

Chez Potier

In one of the latest additions to the ever-changing Cité du Multimédia area, pastry chef Olivier Potier opened up shop in 2021. He’s offering everything from delicately made cakes to a delightful kouglof (a traditional Alsatian brioche), savoury pastries, gourmet grocery items, and takeout dishes out of a ground floor space on Wellington Street.

Audacieuse Vanille

Everything on the menu at Audacieuse Vanielle is close to perfect, though we’re willing to bet you’ll struggle to decide what to eat. Consider its signature carrot cake, its earl grey and orange blossom bundt, or perhaps a frangipane and cranberry tart. Whatever you choose, it’ll be gluten-free, vegan, and soy-free.

Related Maps